English Idioms


back office

Could somebody tell me what is the translation in French for "back-office" ? Thank you Patrice76

10 comments

  • It could be translated as "Fonctions de support" or "Administration".
    Jim
  • Hey! Don't worry about that stuff, it's just the same word and the same meaning.
    What is the French translation for "tunnel" or "train" etc..
    The translation is obvious, but the meaning is the issue.
    The solution is in your French dictionary or preferably in French books specialized in "commercial things".
    Normally only the front-office staff is directly in touch with the clients : for example the sales representatives. In this case the delivery department is the back-office (the clients don't know them).
    But some companies consider their delivery or logistics or transportation departments as being part of the front-office as well if they directly receive the orders from the clients and are in charge of dealing and informing them about the shipping process of a product "made on demand" and about the resulting delivery time.
    So, depending on different organizations, the front-office and the back-office may involve different parts of the staff.
    I won't explain much more, I'm not an expert. This is only one example.
    I'm afraid it's up to you to deepen the subject in your own context.
    Hope that helps... a little bit.
    JP.
  • Thanks again jean-Pierre for all these interesting informations!
    Peace out,
    Willy


    From Jean Pierre:
    Hey! Don't worry about that stuff, it's just the same word and the same meaning.
    What is the French translation for "tunnel" or "train" etc..
    The translation is obvious, but the meaning is the issue.
    The solution is in your French dictionary or preferably in French books specialized in "commercial things".
    Normally only the front-office staff is directly in touch with the clients : for example the sales representatives. In this case the delivery department is the back-office (the clients don't know them).
    But some companies consider their delivery or logistics or transportation departments as being part of the front-office as well if they directly receive the orders from the clients and are in charge of dealing and informing them about the shipping process of a product "made on demand" and about the resulting delivery time.
    So, depending on different organizations, the front-office and the back-office may involve different parts of the staff.
    I won't explain much more, I'm not an expert. This is only one example.
    I'm afraid it's up to you to deepen the subject in your own context.
    Hope that helps... a little bit.
    JP.

     
  • Willy! Are you sure of correctly thanking Jean-Pierre?
  • What do you mean Gee?!
    Willy


    From Gee:
    Willy! Are you sure of correctly thanking Jean-Pierre?

     
  • To Willy


    I had been said that 'information' had to be used in the singular, at least as meaning news, facts, data.
    I thought I should have said: 'thank you for this interesting information' or '... for these interesting pieces of information'.


    I've just looked up in my dictionary. Informations as a plural would mean denunciation or complaint. Ex. to lay an informations against somebody. (SIC in my dico)


    But maybe I'm a bit corny. Or is it American? Or is it the result of a so moving language?
    Tell me.
  • You're right Gee (as always!). Willy gets a bit confused sometimes. It's because he works too many late shifts.
  • You're right Helen.. PPpfffff... I'm so sorry!
    Peace out!
    Willy (The Security Guard of the Delavigne Corp.)


    From Helen Bird:
    You're right Gee (as always!). Willy gets a bit confused sometimes. It's because he works too many late shifts.

     
  • hello everybody,
    this is my first message, so first sorry for the cheapness of my english.


    About the word "back office", I notice nobody tell about a simple translation I think to be correct : "Arrière boutique".


    If I'm doing a mistake tell me...

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