English Grammar


likely to

Philip: Is Bruno likely to come back to the office this afternoon?
Polly: I don't think so, since he will most can likely go out with the board members after his meeting.


Hello,


In the second sentence, we can see : he will most can likely go...
Why "to" doesn't appear in the sentence just after likely ?

8 comments

  • There is a cumbersome wretched word in Polly's answer, Delphine. It's the CAN that has nothing to do there.
    Polly would say: ... he will most likely go out with board members ...


    In Philip's say, likely is an adjective. "Is he likely to come back?"


    In Polly's answer, likely is an adverb. The verb in the future is WILL GO OUT. He will go out. He will likely go out. He will most likely go out.


    Gotcha, Delphine?
  • Hello Delphine,


    As AhQ wrote, the CAN doesn't belong in the sentence. Perhaps it you made a mistake and in the correction CAN was written in red?


    @AhQ: Gotcha is used when you (the speaker) understand something. It can't be used to ask someone else if they've understood. In this case, you could say 'Got it?'.
  • Got it !


    I made a mistake when I wrote CAN (sorry for this)


    Many thanks
    Delphine
  • Thank you so much, Andrew, for curing me of a wrong idea of what 'gotcha' meant.
    If I am not mistaken, Delphine could have said 'gotcha !' as well.
    You are great !
  • This post was deleted by the author 6¬†years, 4¬†months ago.



  • Hi, "May" cannot be used in an interrogative clause.




    "Is it likely to" replaces "may" in interrogative sentence.

    Philip: Is Bruno likely to come back to the office this afternoon? the answer could be : "Yes, Bruno may come back to the office this afternoon, if his mother feels better and can stay alone at home".

    Polly would say: ... he will most likely stay with her until she feels better, you know, she was very ill last night, and she still has a high temperature.

    but in affirmative clause : "may" and "will likely" seem to not have the same sens.

    May : he can (it's a possibility)

    Will likely : it's preferable

    I think you may understand, feel and then use the one or the other.

    Regards
  • ...Kurtleen, I learned (long ago) we could say : "May I come with you ?" for example... In fact, it seems to be only with "I" or "we"... Then it has the meaning of "could", as when we ask permission...


  • Hi idoine91.

    Thanks .. Yes, it's true ...

    Yesterday, i continued my research and i found : "May i talk to you for a minute Sir?"

    and indeed it has the meaning of "could", as when we ask permission...

    whereas "Is it likely to rain tomorrow?" it's not a permission, it's an eventuality, an uncertainty about whether yes or not, it rains tomorrow.

    Have a good day, and thanks again !

Please sign in to leave a comment.