English Grammar


Confusion in using if and would in the same sentence

I have learned in high school that it is forbidden to use if and would in the same sentence. But now gymglish gave me the following correction in my last lesson: "I would appreciate it if you would not smoke on the bus." I would appreciate it very much if someone could explain to me the right solution. Thank you very much in advance!

12 comments

  • I would say the rule you have learnt isn't accurate. "If I would" isn't correct, we must use "were" in this form of tense : if I were. But what comes after in this sentence comes inevitably with "would" : If I were you I would call him. But it does'nt explain the example you quote :" I would appreciate it if you would not smoke on the bus" I 've the feeling it is not the same because of the "double would " but I have no knowledge in grammar, only feelings ;) I leave the floor to confirmed fellow learner, I hope they can tell you (us) better
  • Say that "to use if and would in one single sentence" seems a bit short. What better feelings could I get than Pimpanella's ? I just wonder whether "if + subject + would" is not usually coming in polite speeches like these ones: If you would take your seats, ladies and gentlemen, the lecture could start. or maybe (?) If you would take your seats, the lecture will start. I you would be so kind as to stub out your fag, the non-smokers would appreciate it so much. If I were Reto, I 'would appreciate Pimpanella's ideas. Bye now.
  • This post was deleted by the author 6 years, 8 months ago.

  • That's perfectly clear. I hadn't ever thought that the GymGlish would count a so prominent grammarian as Calcard. He deserves to be warmly thanked. More to the point that, as far as I'm concerned, I learned what a "rule of thumb" is.
  • This post was deleted by the author 6 years, 8 months ago.

  • You're a scream, Calcard. For sure the lab was Horatio's. Now thousands of GGusers' mouths are watering.
  • :)) That's a colorfull explanation, and I'm delighted to learn expressions like rule of thumb, (nothing to do with a finger, so) but also "suit of mine" and please, what is a scream , I guess it's not a shout here ?
  • You're on the right way, Pimpanella. The first meaning of 'scream' is a loud sharp cry or noise indeed, but as you guessed, "You are a scream" means rather "you make me laugh", ("vous êtes marrant"). It's funny, isn't it, imagining Calcard as a capuchin monkey rewarded with grapes or cucumbers.
  • Yes, it is ! I wish he could set his image as a capucin monkey in his profile, but it looks like for now, only the administrators members are able to use this feature. You are a scream, ok, I put this in my file, thank a lot !

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