English Grammar


any and plural

Lesson 1,#7 It is said:"'any' cannot be used with a singular, countable noun: 'I don't have any friend' is grammatically incorrect. "...and the line just below, it is written:" the main verb ('has') does not carry any negation", with no "s" for negation? negation is supposed to be a countable name, so, negations whould be more correct , according with the first remark, would not it?

6 comments

  • Your question is quite interesting, Pissadou, even though not that easy clarifying. The grammar rules are built from the way the language spontaneously grows. Many cases of the language stick to the rules but some particuliar cases often go otherwise............ I quote your report of a GymGlish text: "'any' cannot be used with a singular, countable noun." That seems to be true with the example that is said 'grammatically' incorrect. Mind the qualitative 'grammatically'. I think they would say " I don't have a single friend" or "I don't have friends" because many peple have many friends, a term that is used to being countable. But I think that the rule hasn't to be applied literally but according to the meaning. I'd say "that coach hasn't got any driver" as the noun driver is countable but any bus is supposed to count one driver at a time. I also read in my dictionary that "this pan hasn't got any lid." because a pan hasn't ever several lids at the same time................................ Now let's shift to your second quotation "the verb doesn't carry any negation." Of course the word negation can be countable is some contexts, for instance as a headline of a list of negative sentences. But here negation rather means the act or process of negating. In this context it looks more like an uncountable term. In the same way, they would say "I don't see any reason to believe...". Can 'reason', like 'negation', not go as an uncountable concept?...................................Mind you, Pissadou. This is only a way of explanation fancied by a guy who's been a GymGlish fan for many years but who is far from being a grammarian or a literate person. So take his opinion with a pinch of doubt and try to further explore it?
  • AhQ ['a: kiu] said

    Your question is quite interesting, Pissadou, even though not that easy clarifying. The grammar rules are built from the way the language spontaneously grows. Many cases of the language stick to the rules but some particuliar cases often go otherwise............ I quote your report of a GymGlish text: "'any' cannot be used with a singular, countable noun." That seems to be true with the example that is said 'grammatically' incorrect. Mind the qualitative 'grammatically'. I think they would say " I don't have a single friend" or "I don't have friends" because many peple have many friends, a term that is used to being countable. But I think that the rule hasn't to be applied literally but according to the meaning. I'd say "that coach hasn't got any driver" as the noun driver is countable but any bus is supposed to count one driver at a time. I also read in my dictionary that "this pan hasn't got any lid." because a pan hasn't ever several lids at the same time................................ Now let's shift to your second quotation "the verb doesn't carry any negation." Of course the word negation can be countable is some contexts, for instance as a headline of a list of negative sentences. But here negation rather means the act or process of negating. In this context it looks more like an uncountable term. In the same way, they would say "I don't see any reason to believe...". Can 'reason', like 'negation', not go as an uncountable concept?...................................Mind you, Pissadou. This is only a way of explanation fancied by a guy who's been a GymGlish fan for many years but who is far from being a grammarian or a literate person. So take his opinion with a pinch of doubt and try to further explore it?

      Thank you AhQ for your answer, which I find rather judicious
  • Je voudrais la correction de l'exercice de révision scene 44. Mes réponses ont été effacées et je n'ai pas le corrigé. Voici le texte avec mes réponses much ou many. An issue is of much concern to many environmentalists is the destruction of rainforests ... . In many countries, ...... the natural environments of many rare animals and plants ..... to take advantages of the many re which can be ....sources
  • Wouldn't you find the correction in your Workbook? What you are reporting seems correct to me taking into account that I can't understand your last 11 words.
  • When I use any and when I use some?. What are the rules for each?
  • I think that question can't be settled in a flash, José.
    In short, I'd say about any as an adjective:

    1° any come for some in negative contexts.
    I have some money -> I don't have any money.

    2° any comes for some in questions, hypotheses.
    You have some children but have you got any daughter?

    3° any also can mean no matter which or no matter how much.
    He is likely to come any time now. Take any road you want.
    They have any amount of time/money/... (= as much as needed)
     
    That's a bit short indeed. But the use of any comes with practice as I did with Gymglish.
    See you, José.

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