English Idioms


to deserve

Hi, I'd like to know what this nexpresion means: "you deserve better from me". I'm not sure about that.
Thank so much

4 comments

  • Hi,


    I'm not sure but I think it's mean you can have (merit) better person than me.


    Ciao
  • Thank so much, your comments have been very useful.
  • Hi, I'd like to know what this nexpresion means: "you deserve better from me". I'm not sure about that.
    Thank so much
  • An idea about the Lupe's grammar question.


    As an intransitive verb, deserve generally means to be worthy of someone/something. Its use seems to be literary.
    As synonym of WORTHY OF, deserve (intransitive) is generally followed by OF: to DESERVE OF s.o./sthg = to be DESERVING OF s.o./sthg
    French: méritant DE ; German: verdienstvoll VON ?[your nickname sounds German, hey!]
    "To deserve well of one's country" (Robert & Collins)
    "He deserves of his regiment"


    Have a look at http://www.answers.com/


    Deserve comes, via Old French 'deservir', from Latin de-servire, meaning to serve with zeal.


    In the item you posted, I wonder whether the verb isn't used in its transitive form. You deserve better from me > you deserve a better thing from me (= You deserve that I provide you with something better). The context should give you some clue.

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