English Vocabulary


french to english

i would like to have more vocabulary exercices french->english than english->french.
how i can have that?
thank's

29 comments - page 2

  • Hi Zina.
    Last Sunday I bought a return ticket to Paris. I had planned to come by a famous perfume shop in Montmartre.
    As I exited the Northern Railway Station, I came along to the Terminus Nord.
    It was a bit crowded. So I had to tread my way through the people to get a table. I soon caught sight of two handsome women eating bouillabaise and using their hands a lot to talk in a liven up manner. One of them looked like a steady Parisian for she had the gift of the gab to look so. Her partner opposite seemed to come from abroad while looking like a big traveller. I couldn't catch any word of their conversation. I wondered what they could talk about. But I thought to myself: these two are catching up with each other.
    If I tell you that, it's because a couple of hours later I bumped into them both on the Champs Elysées. They were keeping making a lot gestures.
    Here is my question, Zina:
    Besides the deaf-and-dumb language, which spoken language did they use? French? English? Russian?
    Looking forward to your reply.
    Gee


  • If tatiana and I were those women, we used russian and/or french because it's very difficult to speak russian fluently as English is (for me). tatiana seanks French fluently and I think I'll never speak russian like that neither English !

    Thursday, I took the train TGV to go to Montpellier-La Grande Motte-Aigues-Mortes. Were you in the train Gee ? In the afternoon I visited the "salins du Midi". No sun, no rain but many wind. A spacious property (like Paris) with sun, water and salt. Sea, rose flamingos, sea gulls, some herons... As I was the only woman the salt-man gave me a salt rose (5 kilograms. I was very afraid when we climbed on the conveyor belt which carry salt at the top of the salt montain. At the top of the platform, wa saw the high defensive walls of Aigues-Mortes. It was beautiful but the platform was shaked with the strong gusts of wind. I took many photos but I did'nt see the salt which shines under the sun. When we took the bus to go to the hotel, rain began to fall. Friday I was back in Paris with my salt rose. Gee or somebody else, did you see a woman with a salt rose of 5 kilos in the Lyon Railways station Friday at 12 ?
  • Excuse me everybody but I use the word "sun" in the place of "sand". In salins du Midi, there was no sun but many sand... and many, many, many salt !!!
  • I think it will be better to meet us in the topic "Gymglish Users - Lounge" I created the sub-topic "Talking". See you there to talk about everything...


    How to say "interlocuteur" in English ? Is there a word to say this ?"
  • From Zina:
    I think it will be better to meet us in the topic "Gymglish Users - Lounge" I created the sub-topic "Talking". See you there to talk about everything...


    How to say "interlocuteur" in English ? Is there a word to say this ?"

     


    In the dictionary it says "interlocutor" but the last time I use this translation in front of my american collegue, he laughed at me, trying to explain me it doesn't make any sense :(
    You can say : "the person I was talking to" for example to express the same meaning as "interlocuteur" ;)


    Seb
  • Thanks to Seb890 ! I'll use these words.
  • Hello,
    As Antoine said it's the best way to improve. But for the pronouciation you can repeat after listening to the audio-text, step by step, until the words come out with a nice music (english sound) because any langage is, first of all, only but a music. You can start to imitate your favorite singerfor exemple.


    regards


    Roulab
  • When I was a student, I was always translating and I remember it was hard work. Trying to speak English is something, but translating is an other job, a big one, so difficult. I guess some of us won’t agree with me, but I think a translation is not so often useful. Understanding is enough, translating is something else, something I don’t need. The best evidence is that we all learned as babies our native language with no dictionary. Speaking English is not translating French ideas into English, it’s rather exchanging ideas with Britons or Yankees or Canadians and even others who’s languages we don’t get. I’m not saying books or dictionaries are to be thrown into garbage cans. Now and then I use them as well and check out a spelling or a subtlety in meaning. I’m just saying I do prefer to use my own words instead of synonyms I’m not comfortable with. On an other hand, the best word is the one the other speaker is expecting depending on their culture. For sure, a « roundabout » for example, is a word you can look up from a very British dictionary. And guess what? That weird traffic circle makes no sense western the Atlantic ocean. What did you say? INTERLOCUTEUR? An American other speaker laughed at somebody here? I’m sure it was a smile, not a sneer! So, laughing, this is the good way for the future! May I add my word of the day? I chat with other speakers and I Email with recipients. Hope someone got my babbles. You would have told it an other way? I'm interested. You're welcome.
  • From Jean Pierre:
    When I was a student, I was always translating and I remember it was hard work. Trying to speak English is something, but translating is an other job, a big one, so difficult. I guess some of us won’t agree with me, but I think a translation is not so often useful. Understanding is enough, translating is something else, something I don’t need. The best evidence is that we all learned as babies our native language with no dictionary. Speaking English is not translating French ideas into English, it’s rather exchanging ideas with Britons or Yankees or Canadians and even others who’s languages we don’t get. I’m not saying books or dictionaries are to be thrown into garbage cans. Now and then I use them as well and check out a spelling or a subtlety in meaning. I’m just saying I do prefer to use my own words instead of synonyms I’m not comfortable with. On an other hand, the best word is the one the other speaker is expecting depending on their culture. For sure, a « roundabout » for example, is a word you can look up from a very British dictionary. And guess what? That weird traffic circle makes no sense western the Atlantic ocean. What did you say? INTERLOCUTEUR? An American other speaker laughed at somebody here? I’m sure it was a smile, not a sneer! So, laughing, this is the good way for the future! May I add my word of the day? I chat with other speakers and I Email with recipients. Hope someone got my babbles. You would have told it an other way? I'm interested. You're welcome.

     
    "Hope someone got my babbles?"
    Trust granted, Jean-Pierre. I feel very fascinated by your blabs. They aren’t babbles at all. Your considerations seem to me to be the wiser piece of advice ever released in the present forum.


    "You would have told it an other way? You're welcome."
    I would try and tell it with other words. What a thrilling challenge, what an exciting workout from a good piece of litterature.


    He is a shrewd man that Jean-Pierre!
    It'd be good for us that he daily delivered his word of the day.
  • From Gee:


    "Hope someone got my babbles?"
    Trust granted, Jean-Pierre. I feel very fascinated by your blabs. They aren’t babbles at all. Your considerations seem to me to be the WIESEST PIECES of advice ever released in the present forum.


    "You would have told it an other way? You're welcome."
    I would try and tell it with other words. What a thrilling challenge, what an exciting workout from a good piece of litterature.


    He is a shrewd man that Jean-Pierre!
    It'd be good for us that he daily delivered his word of the day.

     

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