English Grammar


Use of 'do' in affirmative sentences

What is the difference in the use of


"If you do object to this visit..."


and


"If you object to this visit..."


In particular, in which cases do we use 'do' in affirmative sentences ? Is it to emphasize the considered action (here 'to object') ? Or is it simply recorded as a special use of the verb 'to do', i.e. 'to do object'.


Thank you very much.


Best,
Jack

6 comments

  • the two sentense do not mean the same sens
    the firt signify what's the objectif of this visit
    the second s'oppose avec la visite
  • Well, Yes, Laurent, it means that you see -and are quite certain that you see, however strange it may seem- helicopters flying, helicopters, sure enough, and not ladybugs...
  • Another example coming from my 119th lesson :


    "I do see helicopters flying in the south"


    Does this mean :


    1°) I actually see helicopters flying
    2°) I insist that I see helicopters flying
    3°) Yes, indeed, I see helicopters flying


    Best,
    Laurent
  • From Lou Loulou:
    the two sentense do not mean the same sens
    the firt signify what's the objectif of this visit
    the second s'oppose avec la visite

     


    Not sure to understand exactly what you mean.


    I'm quite sure that there is absolutely no objective description in the first sentence. Unless you provide other arguments...


    Best,
    Jack
  • What is the difference in the use of


    "If you do object to this visit..."


    and


    "If you object to this visit..."


    In particular, in which cases do we use 'do' in affirmative sentences ? Is it to emphasize the considered action (here 'to object') ? Or is it simply recorded as a special use of the verb 'to do', i.e. 'to do object'.


    Thank you very much.


    Best,
    Jack
  • I think you did say it indeed. Just emphasizing!

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