English Grammar


How to use them

I do not know the differences between despite or in spite of, when I have to use one or other?

3 comments

  • Despite my status of learner, I'm so bold as to tell you what I think about the issue, you going by the name of brighten.


    Here you are with what I found out in my dictionaries.
    The radical SPITE comes from Latin (spicere, to look at)
    DESPITE comes from Latin through Middle English (despicere, to despise, to look down on, to look down with contempt)
    In Middle English yet, SPITE was used as short for DESPITE.


    The expression "in spite of" comes from "in despite of" that can still been used by now in a less everyday speech to mean "in defiance or contempt of" .
    "Despite" and "in spite of" nowadays are working as synonym for notwithstanding, however, nevertheless, although.


    In my opinion, "despite" and "in spite of" are pure synonyms.
    In spite of the fact that synonyms are thought for bringing up the same meaning, they are different in shape and sound. It's an aesthetic issue; according to your feeling, you'll be using the one or the other.
  • Thank you very much, you have very good dictionaries. Better than mine.
  • From Gee:
    Despite my status of learner, I'm so bold as to tell you what I think about the issue, you going by the name of brighten.


    Here you are with what I found out in my dictionaries.
    The radical SPITE comes from Latin (spicere, to look at)
    DESPITE comes from Latin through Middle English (despicere, to despise, to look down on, to look down with contempt)
    In Middle English yet, SPITE was used as short for DESPITE.


    The expression "in spite of" comes from "in despite of" that can still been used by now in a less everyday speech to mean "in defiance or contempt of" .
    "Despite" and "in spite of" nowadays are working as synonym for notwithstanding, however, nevertheless, although.


    In my opinion, "despite" and "in spite of" are pure synonyms.
    In spite of the fact that synonyms are thought for bringing up the same meaning, they are different in shape and sound. It's an aesthetic issue; according to your feeling, you'll be using the one or the other.






     

Please sign in to leave a comment.