English Idioms


idioms list

does someone have a complete idioms list to share with us?
or a good reference?

29 comments

  • Does an extensive list of idioms exist?
    Does an extensive dictionary disclose all the words and expressions of a language?
    Idioms are not a separate part of a language, they share the core, the essential part of a language.
    I guess there are several books or dictionaries which deal with idioms.


    To address your resquest, I can just mention one I recently bought secondhand.


    ENGLISH IDIOMS and how to use them
    by Seidl and McMordie
    (pocket format, Oxford English)
    Oxford University press, 1978, 268pp
    ISBN 0 19 432764 7


    I presume there are a lot of other books dealing with idioms.
  • This is one, but its the sort of thing english language teachers will use:
    http://www.cambridge.org/elt/elt_projectpage.asp?id=2500224


    there are exercises that a student can do in their own
  • 2 small funny books :
    "Sky my husband" Edition Hermé
    and
    "Sky my wife" Edition Carrère
    Jean-Loup Chiflet
    Points Actuels
  • Two other funny books:


    "Les Idiomatics français-anglais"
    Textes de Geneviève Blum
    Dessins de Nestor Salas
    Coll. Point-Virgule (Ed. du Seuil 1989)


    "Au pays des faux-amis" (petit guide illustré anglais-français)
    Samuel Cranston & Charles Szlakmann
    Coll. Point-Virgule (Ed. du Seuil 1990)
  • I'll bye the book"au pays des faux amis" because in english there are many many "faux amis" and that make me sick.......
  • I suppose, Catherine, that you wanted to write
    "...because in ENGLAND there are many many false friends..."


    for in England there is a Tony (I mean the Bush's puddle) who has many, many friends who are not our friends but play to be it. That's what we call false friends.


    That should not make you sick, particularly not on the book you're going to buy.


    Friendly yours,
    Gee
  • ok,Gee, for "in England there are many many false friends"...I did'nt never go in England, but I beleve you.


    Bush's puddle is so cold...I'go to take a medication right now as a preventive.


    ( Excuse-me because my english is approximate)


    Friendly yours too,
    Catherine
  • Good to you, Catherine, to take a preventive because I made a big mistake by mistaking puddle with poodle.
    As long as you thought of a puddle of cold water, you were right.
    But I meant poodle! British citizens said many a time that Tony Blair is the Bush's poodle.
    A puddle is a very small pool of dirty water.
    A poodle is a dog.
    This is nothing to be proud. Just a bit sorry.
    But I don't actually apologize, for there is gold in mistake (I translate Mathieu Chedid "Il y a de l'or dans l'erreur.") I guess that I won't never mistake those two homonyms again. And I trust that you won't too.


    This leads us far away from idioms but could hint a new headline with homonyms.




    "

    From Catherine Angevin-Djian:
    ok,Gee, for "in England there are many many false friends"...I did'nt never go in England, but I beleve you.


    Bush's puddle is so cold...I'go to take a medication right now as a preventive.


    ( Excuse-me because my english is approximate)


    Friendly yours too,
    Catherine

     
  • I woudn't take anyone on a slippery slope.
    Puddle and poodle are not homonyms at all.


    Puddle is pronounced 'p^dl
    Poodle is said 'pu:dl


    With a poodle in my noodle
    The puddle got me into a muddle.
    -------
    noodle = head - especially head of a simpleton (stupid person)
    muddle = a state of mental confusion




    From Gee:
    Good to you, Catherine, to take a preventive because I made a big mistake by mistaking puddle with poodle.
    As long as you thought of a puddle of cold water, you were right.
    But I meant poodle! British citizens said many a time that Tony Blair is the Bush's poodle.
    A puddle is a very small pool of dirty water.
    A poodle is a dog.
    This is nothing to be proud. Just a bit sorry.
    But I don't actually apologize, for there is gold in mistake (I translate Mathieu Chedid "Il y a de l'or dans l'erreur.") I guess that I won't never mistake those two homonyms again. And I trust that you won't too.


    This leads us far away from idioms but could hint a new headline with homonyms.




    "

     

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