English Vocabulary


How to spell a word

LEADING ARTICLE [Fr. éditorial / Ge. Leitartikel / Sp. editorial]
In verbal communication not native are most liable to have to spell a word. How do we spell a word? By uttering letters one by one. If the speaker doesn’t pronounce the letter quite correctly, or on long distance calls with static noise, a misunderstanding is easily distorting the message. To prevent such bugs, people tell letters by a full first name beginning with that letter. For instance, to orally spell the word 'Dirk' some could tell 'Derris Irma Rhys Kevin'. The listener can as well understand 'Ferris Ulma Chris Kevin', making 'Fuck'.
Even by using any name up to the speaker, a misunderstanding may happen.
Therefore GG users had better using the international phraseology adopted for International Radio Communications. Standard words have been chosen so as not to be misheard.


If you haven’t practised that standard spelling so far, I’ll display it in the present thread, 3 letters at a time. In a fortnight or so, you should be able to be fluent with the international spelling.
[CW] (this code is not listed in the International Radio Communication phraseology!)

25 comments - page 2

  • [CS] (corrections suggested) to French edelweiss [CW]
    "to get an hotel closed to India" should turn into somewhat like "to get a closed hotel in India".
    1° I think "closed" cannot be used as noun.
    2° Hotel begins with an aspirate h (even if you breath out at saying it), you'll spend the night in a hotel.
    3° In India because you'll be there yet at the moment you get it.


    I'm very interested in learning whether a Williamine makes you rave.
    Thank you in advance for informing me.
    Keep being happy.
    L.b.
    [CW]
  • Ok Lucky bastard, I'm going to try to be clear. All this was about introducing a spelling of the word "whisky" written "wiskey" in Guardian Angel's list. Maybe a little bit obscure but that was the game I was playing at. Rather than "closed" I meant "close to" (because of the H close to the I) and without Echo to put off the E. And as this little exercise raved me, I extended the W irish beverage to the alternative Williamine swiss white alcohol made out of pear. (Very good speciality. There is also Abricotine and a large range of fruits).
    And all that kept me happy for a while!
    Thank you anyway.
    [CW]
  • Good to me. The French edelweiss didn't get furious with my thick mind. I'm so much imaginative that I thought of a closed hotel and so many pleasures going by.


    I didn't even notice that the Angel had dropped a letter from his beverage. Sure he was plastered. I infer from that bug that the Guardian Angel may be the guardian of a soul but not the guardian of the Letter.


    From now on my personal motto will be:
    Don't rave. Be brave.
    [CW]
  • What a blunder! But every cloud has a silver lining. So, from now on, we can spell the letter W by drinking a Williamine or an Abricotine instead of being stuck to the Scottish or Irish whisky/whiskey.


    Tell me, dear French edelweiss, how many Williamine are you used to gulping down at a boozing party? If the number overtakes the ten, you have to know to to spell the number on the phone.


    A number is usually spelt by telling its figures one at a time.
    For ex. 01 53 33 85 13
    ZERO ONE FIVE THREE THREE THREE EIGHT FIVE ONE THREE
    In your daily phone talk you might say O (instead of zero) and "triple three" but that's not permitted in official international radio phraseology.
    Moreover the figure 9 has to be uttered NINEr in order to not being mistaken for FIVE.
    The round hundreds are to be spelled ONE HUNDRED - TWO HUNDRED - ...
    The round thousands are said ONE THOUSAND - TWO THOUSAND -...
    5,200 : FIVE THOUSAND TWO HUNDRED
    5,243 : FIVE TWO FOUR THREE


    To get used to spelling words and numbers, I practised it when flying along aircrafts in the sky, spelling their registration number. You might do it when driving your car in the daily boring commuting, spelling the plate number of the car before yours.
    [CW]
  • Dear Guardian Angel,


    I had a short dream during my Sunday nap, a stupid dream about Romeo and Juliet.As it started in the sky, I want to tell it to you:


    In NOVEMBER, ROMEO and JULIET decided to go and see their old PAPA, VICTOR, in LIMA. First of all, their 20-KILO luggage was X-RAYed and then, they flew over INDIA and the SIERRA. They stayed at a HOTEL called ALPHA DELTA (so as not to disturb their elderly papa). It was great: they drank WHISKY, did the TANGO and danced the FOX –TROT. They also made friends with a YANKEE, OSCAR, and a chap from QUEBEC called MIKE. When they played GOLF, a ZULU, nicknamed CHARLIE, wearing a funny UNIFORM cheered to the ECHO (=applauder à tout rompre) and shouted BRAVO…


    I was suddenly woken up by a strange noise coming from a squirrel cage in the adjoining room and... it was tea-time.No Abricotine at 2.30!


    Bye dear Angel.
    Silky. C.W.
  • Now we're ready to get any spelling from Czeki to Finland and communicate the number of minutes to wait until the next blossoming of edelweiss. That's great.


    By the way, dear Guardian Angel, could you tell us who created this rules; is it, as I suppose, a Yankee wearing a Uniform? Which was the first impulse, telephone or aeronautic? A question in the air..


    You are over-estimating my ability to gulping down ;-)
    I'm not a "gentiane"!
  • [CW] of course.
  • Oh Silky, what an amazing story.
    I never had such a story at hand as I struggled to master the spelling codes for radiophony. You have to secure the copyright. Your text is fated to be a textbook in more than one school.


    Hi wise Edelweiss,
    Have you doubts about the angel's list of words? For my part, I don't.
    Of course, being yourself involved in many distilleries' phials, you right away pointed out that the angelic whisky tasted strange. But tastes aren't forwarded on air.
    I'm looking forward to learning from the Angel when, where and by whom that phraseology has been fixed.
    May I add how to say the decimals?
    123.5 one two three DECIMAL five (not "dot" five!)


    Well, our ancestors didn't use that whole caboodle, they used Morse code.
    [CW]
  • From Silky:
    Dear Guardian Angel,


    I had a short dream during my Sunday nap, a stupid dream about Romeo and Juliet.As it started in the sky, I want to tell it to you:


    In NOVEMBER, ROMEO and JULIET decided to go and see their old PAPA, VICTOR, in LIMA. First of all, their 20-KILO luggage was X-RAYed and then, they flew over INDIA and the SIERRA. They stayed at a HOTEL called ALPHA DELTA (so as not to disturb their elderly papa). It was great: they drank WHISKY, did the TANGO and danced the FOX –TROT. They also made friends with a YANKEE, OSCAR, and a chap from QUEBEC called MIKE. When they played GOLF, a ZULU, nicknamed CHARLIE, wearing a funny UNIFORM cheered to the ECHO (=applauder à tout rompre) and shouted BRAVO…


    I was suddenly woken up by a strange noise coming from a squirrel cage in the adjoining room and... it was tea-time.No Abricotine at 2.30!


    Bye dear Angel.
    Silky. C.W.

     
    ****************************
    Best Silky,


    Once more you proved to be second to none as a dreamer and story-writer.
    I've been impressed by your 26 alphabetical words story.
    It's worth cheering to the echo!


    Gee is right. Secure the copyright. Don't procrastinate because some bloke fearing neither god nor man might steal your amazing tale.


    I am grateful towards you for your time and help.
    G.A.
    [C.W.]
  • From French edelweiss:
    Now we're ready to get any spelling from Czeki to Finland and communicate the number of minutes to wait until the next blossoming of edelweiss. That's great.


    By the way, dear Guardian Angel, could you tell us who created this rules; is it, as I suppose, a Yankee wearing a Uniform? Which was the first impulse, telephone or aeronautic? A question in the air..


    You are over-estimating my ability to gulping down ;-)
    I'm not a "gentiane"!

     
    ********************************
    Dear White Flower,


    I thank you so much for taking part in our chit-chat.
    First, before answering your question, I'd like to ask you one of my own. Every how many minutes is an edelweiss blossoming?


    Secondly, your question: which organisation implemented an official phraseology for radio communications? It's an international agreement whose I don't right away remember the details. As I am up to my neck for the moment, I feel obliged to postpone providing it, unless someone else do it before me. Any certified radiotelephonist on job in air, sea or land radio communications uses the international alphabet.


    Thirdly, I promise to never take you for a gentiane again.
    See you later, (white) alligator,
    G.A.
    [C.W.]

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