English Vocabulary


trove

I did not know the word "trove". You explained it is synonimous for treasure. OK then but why the expression " the treasure trove towers" or simply Alibaba's treasure trove " for my understanding this is a redundancy. I would appreciate some explanations. Thanks for your help.

4 comments

  • Well, showy flower, can't you detect a meaning nuance between "treasure" and "treasure trove"?
    - treasure comes from French trésor.
    - trove comes from French trouver.
    As for me (maybe only for me?) I would restrict the appellation "treasure trove" to a treasure being likely to be found out. E.g. I'd fancy to know the words to enter the Alibaba's cave and find out his treasure trove.
    No doubt you are a treasure, water-lily.
    Would you be a treasure trove for anyone?




    From water-lily:
    I did not know the word "trove". You explained it is synonimous for treasure. OK then but why the expression " the treasure trove towers" or simply Alibaba's treasure trove " for my understanding this is a redundancy. I would appreciate some explanations. Thanks for your help.

     
  • From Gee:
    Well, showy flower, can't you detect a meaning nuance between "treasure" and "treasure trove"?
    - treasure comes from French trésor.
    - trove comes from French trouver.
    As for me (maybe only for me?) I would restrict the appellation "treasure trove" to a treasure being likely to be found out. E.g. I'd fancy to know the words to enter the Alibaba's cave and find out his treasure trove.
    No doubt you are a treasure, water-lily.
    Would you be a treasure trove for anyone?




     
  • From water-lily :


    I do appreciate your explanation on the " meaning nuance " between treasure and treasure trove. I will use these words in the future according to your "excerpt" and will experience !!! I love this ability for the English language to express such a kind of nuance for which we are also used to in French : please tell me the "meaning nuance" for you between " "nénuphar " and "numphéa"
    Awaiting your comments at the soonest.


    Water-lily
  • From water-lily:
    From water-lily :


    I do appreciate your explanation on the " meaning nuance " between treasure and treasure trove. I will use these words in the future according to your "excerpt" and will experience !!! I love this ability for the English language to express such a kind of nuance for which we are also used to in French : please tell me the "meaning nuance" for you between " "nénuphar " and "numphéa"
    Awaiting your comments at the soonest.


    Water-lily


     
    Hello water-lily.


    I apologize for the delay in responding to your message. Especially as you required my comments at the soonest! It is not that I was away on business or on vacation. I actually was idle. And I got roaming a lot around the forum but I didn't detect you message.
    Though I feel only half-guilty. Remember! On the 17th you filed a message split in two parts. First at 04:28 PM CET a blank message with the copy of mine.
    I must have seen it some moments later.
    The same day you filed a message again at 05:16 PM and that time, your text was on.
    But every time I passed by the "Vocabulary panel" while roaming around the forum, I could see just above the gate that you had filed a message but I thought it was the blank one.


    Now let's get to the point.
    I think that "nénuphar" is the French word to call a water-lily.
    I never heard or read "numphéa".
    If you hadn't written a stress above the e , I could have thought it was the Latin name coming from Greek in turning the y into a u.
    French talking people like me say and write "nymphéa" which is the French word for a white water-lily.
    Now, showy flower, tell us more about yourself. Are you actually a water-lily or a white water-lily. Which colo(u)r is your skin? your eyes? your hair?


    Anyway to put the right spin on the question, I will point out the etymology.
    You are of divine lineage, showy flower.
    Your Latin ancestor was a bride (a nympha). This latter coming from the Greek nymphè, the nymph!
    You are a nymph, showy flower. A nymph amongst the other nymphs, beautiful girl dwelling in the mountains, trees and lakes.
    You are a goddess.
    Would Shakespeare still be alive, he would appoint you to star in his Midnight's Summer Dream.


    But to cut the long story short, tell me: are you water-lily or white water-lily? If I know, it will be much easier to me dreaming about you showy flower.
    Loves
    Gee

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