English Vocabulary


The Sam Shadetree Affair: Bruno checks in with the bank (Scene 3 of 8)

The Sam Shadetree Affair: Bruno checks in with the bank (Scene 3 of 8)


WHAT DOES "CHECKS IN" MEAN IN THIS SENTENCE???

8 comments

  • From Fabio:
    The Sam Shadetree Affair: Bruno checks in with the bank (Scene 3 of 8)


    WHAT DOES "CHECKS IN" MEAN IN THIS SENTENCE???


     
    When working on the Gymglish lesson that's at stake, I ticked on the box for "check in" and I received three different possibilities for that expression. I've just read them again in my workbook.
    Maybe you did so too.


    Here is my comment about the issue.


    Let's suppose that Bruno calls at the bank to be informed of his corporation accounts statement. We should say "Bruno checks in on his bank accounts".


    But we learned in the story that Icarus Quincy had warned Bruno about the excessive cost the bank was charging for its services. Bruno called at the bank to let them know his thought about the issue. He didn't come asking for an information but telling his position.
    That's why it's said: Bruno cheks in with the bank.


    Who will contradict me? Wait and see.
  • Hi, Gee, I agree with your observation: the title means that Bruno is asking the banker to account for his management, it is an easy guess when you know the context. But your explanation is not clear to me. Maybe just because I didn’t even pay attention to the title of the lesson (shame on me!), and therefore didn’t get the three different possibilities for that expression. But the only meaning I know of “check in” is: procedures to comply with at airports, hotels, etc… and I can see no obvious connection with our topic. Would you kindly develop?
    Thanks and nice week-end to you and all Gymglishers!
  • Hello,


    Maybe Bruno went to the bank, with his self confidence as a "CEO", and prided himself to see the manager beeing sorry because their accounts are wrong. He is proud after all! He checks in and he will get, as usual, what he wants in a jiffy, he thinks that he is right that's all!


    Is it an add to your understanding and no contradictions to M.GEE?
    Regards
    Roulab
  • To Saba, Roulab and others interested in
    Could this be for some help?


    A friend of mine that I can trust for speaking very fluently told me this about to check in.


    To check in is commonly used as intransitive verb meaning
    1 : to register at a hotel, airport, etc.
    2 : to report one's presence or arrival e.g. check in at a congress.


    In some context it can be linked to something else by a preposition.
    So (on the phone)
    It's a little late, I'd better check in with my parents, (Il se fait tard, il faudrait que je passe un coup de fil à mes parents).
    I think it's in the same way that in The Sam Shadetree Affair, Bruno checks in with the bank.


    I presume that, according to the Gymglish reliable indications, I checked in ON the "check in" issue in seeking advice from my friend.
    And thereafter I wanted to check in WITH you about that issue.
    __________
    (US)As a transitive verb separable, it means to satisfy all requirements in returning <check in the equipment after using>
    I check in my cases at the checkroom (je dépose mes valises à la consigne.)
    to check in a book at the library (rapporter un livre à la bibliothèque)
    to check a book in (rapporter un livre)
  • Thank you very much to everybody.....


    Could we just say: 'Bruno checks with the bank'?


    thanks again, fabio
  • From Fabio:
    Thank you very much to everybody.....


    Could we just say: 'Bruno checks with the bank'?


    thanks again, fabio




     
    I don't think so.
    Some more examples I got from an American woman:


    According to her Webster's New World Dictionary, whe wrote:
    to check IN the Marriot Hotel (to register at a hotel, a club, etc)
    to check ON the children /my daughter /my e-mails (to investigate, to verify)
    Bruno checks UP ON his bank account. (to verify, investigate)
    I'm checking IN WITH my sister (to register somewhere along with someone)*
    To check OUT (to pay or leave a hotel, establishement)


    *my interpretation - not in the dictionary
  • Hi Fabio, I found this for you :


    " http://www.doityourself.com/stry/ara_textingthesummer
    Today's teens use mobile messaging to say hello, catch up with friends, CHECK IN WITH mom and dad, and more... these trends-setters use mobile messaging to communicate anytime, anywhere with friends, parents, classmates and teammates. "


    May be I'm late. Long time no see... Sorry
    Anyway, I thought it would be kind of... useful :-) It sounds to me as the best example I could find.


    Where is your stuff with this? Don't forget to check in with me about it.
  • Nice that Jean-Pierre comforts the Gymglish using of "check in with".

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