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English talking friends

Hello everybody!


I've just begun to try Gymglish and I think it would be a good thing too to discuss with english talking people! So i'm searching for people to talk by e-mails, because mu web connection is too slow for coming on this forum!


Thank you!


Snake

35 comments

  • English has always a capital letter !
    Writting in English ? It's a good idea, but don't you think that our mistakes won't be corrected ?
  • From nicolo:
    English has always a capital letter !
    Writting in English ? It's a good idea, but don't you think that our mistakes won't be corrected ?

     


    They will indeed, dear nicolo. You've just shown the way.
    And going on your heels, I'll tell you that I'd cross out one t in your writing.


    (As long as needed: translating here "You've just shown the way", I'd write "Tu viens juste de donner l'exemple.")
  • i like very well to speek english and serch a new freinds to righting in e-mail
    my e-email is m_m_tapha@yahoo.fr

    From Snake:
    Hello everybody!


    I've just begun to try Gymglish and I think it would be a good thing too to discuss with english talking people! So i'm searching for people to talk by e-mails, because mu web connection is too slow for coming on this forum!


    Thank you!


    Snake


     
  • From Gee:




    They will indeed, dear nicolo. You've just shown the way.
    And going on your heels, I'll tell you that I'd cross out one t in your writing.


    (As long as needed: translating here "You've just shown the way", I'd write "Tu viens juste de donner l'exemple.")

     




    Thanks for your answers! You see Nicolo, we already have a good professor!


    Gee, could you please remember me the french sentence for " to go on one's heels", because I don't find it in my dictionnary ?!


    To Metzo : writing English, as well as writing French needs to pay attention to the spelling! Your text is full of ortografic mistakes :
    I think you should write " I like very much to speak english and I'm searching for new friends to write to by e-mails ".


    Isn't it that Gee ?
  • From Snake:






    Thanks for your answers! You see Nicolo, we already have a good professor!


    Gee, could you please remember me the french sentence for " to go on one's heels", because I don't find it in my dictionnary ?!


    To Metzo : writing English, as well as writing French needs to pay attention to the spelling! Your text is full of ortografic mistakes :
    I think you should write " I like very much to speak english and I'm searching for new friends to write to by e-mails ".


    Isn't it that Gee ?


     
    I think so, Snake. As I am a bit formal and behind the time, I'd write "English" instead of "english".
    As for me (may be just for me?)
    at somebody's heels, sur les talons de qqn
    to be/to go on somebody's heels, être sur les talons de qqn, aller dans la foulée de qqn (also fig. meaning)
  • Hello,
    I like write and speak english as well as french, it would help me to find a job also a new friend who has a same situation.


    see yea
    thanks
  • From Gee:


    I think so, Snake. As I am a bit formal and behind the time, I'd write "English" instead of "english".
    As for me (may be just for me?)
    at somebody's heels, sur les talons de qqn
    to be/to go on somebody's heels, être sur les talons de qqn, aller dans la foulée de qqn (also fig. meaning)

     


    just a small question, to be/to go on somebody 's hells- it could be uses a lot in english ? it seems that is not currency in use.
    why do you not talk about ? for example. You can not judge a book by its cover.
  • From Kim Chi Graf:




    just a small question, to be/to go on somebody 's hells- it could be uses a lot in english ? it seems that is not currency in use.
    why do you not talk about ? for example. You can not judge a book by its cover.

     
    I'm gonna take your remark into account and be more careful in future.
    However I'd say that I didn't invent that expression. It sprang to my mind easily. That should prove I had heard it somewhere.
    Isn't it currently used? Sure not every day, sure not as often as "How do you do?" Sure it is not informal talk.
    I think that I said "going on your heels" intead of "going after you" probably because I had just read it in an article of "Newsweek" but I cannot now precisely find the page again.
    Due to your question, I looked up in my dictionaries. It's reported so in the Robert-Collins, in the American Webster as well.
    In my opinion you mean that such an expression is not frequently used in the colloquial language of a rudimentary level.
    Just like in French (I don't know if you're French speaking) "être sur les talons de quelqu'un" or " agir dans la foulée de quelqu'un" won't be heard anywhere on docks and slums.
  • Hello,
    I'm Mamou and live in Martinique - I 'd like to meet the circle ; I think it's a very good idea. My level is very short.


    many sun for you and see you...

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