English Grammar


Why to put a comma? Who's able to explain it to me?

In my today's lesson the following sentence has a comma and I don't know why:
I should tell you up front, these negotiation terms.

7 comments

  • Guten tag, Gwendissima.


    The comma marks the border between the two phrases of the sentence.


    Phrase 1
    I should tell you up front = I should be frank with you.


    Phrase 2
    These negociation terms = ?
    Are you sure it is "these" and not "this"?
    Unless the verb term not have a fianl s.
    These : pronoun for these (things, talks, ...)
    If so, the phrase should be written "these negociation term."
    Or this: pronoun
    If so, the phrase should be: "this negociation terms."
    Verb to term: to call, to name.
    Negociation is complement of the verb term(s).
  • I agree with you, there is no need of using comma. Because if you do so, the meaning of the sentence is totally diferente and even, with the comma, it doesn´t make sense.
  • From raynel:
    I agree with you, there is no need of using comma. Because if you do so, the meaning of the sentence is totally different and even, with the comma, it doesn´t make sense.

     
  • Good Morning! Guten Tag! Bonjour! Günaydin! Dzien dobry! Nice to meet you both!


    Thanks, that's what I felt about this case too. First I asked me, wether it's really "these", than I had to reflect, whether "terms" is the plural of a noun or the 3. person singular of a verb.
    It doesn't make sence.
    (C.w.)
  • [CS: whether - sense.
    I ask me: For sure we understand you, Gwendolina, but it's more usual to ask oneself.
    I ask myself = I wonder whether/if = (more or less) I think to myself.]
    ----------------------------------


    Shall I stick to my guns, whether Raynel like it or not, whether Gwendo like it or not. Definitely no!


    Anyhow we all agree that the sentence as reported by Gwendo doesn't make sense.


    Without a comma: "I should tell you upfront these negotiation terms."
    Such a statement, if true, supposes that the speaker is reporting the result of the negociation. Moreover it supposes that upfront is an adverb. Meaning with other words "I should tell you frankly the terms of the negociation."


    Thank you, Raynel. Thank you, multilingual Gwendo.
    ----
    But I looked further in some dictionaries.


    up front (in two words) doesn't mean frankly but in advance, beforehand. It's an adverb.


    Upfront or up-front is rather adjective. I must be upfront with you. I'll be upfront and tell you the terms of our negociation.
    As it is slang, we might agree that that adjective be used as an adverb.


    Finally I think we could take the sentence this way:
    I should tell you up front these negotiation terms.
    Meaning:
    I should tell you beforehand these terms of the negociation.


    Anyway the sentence as reported by Gwendo is screwed-up.
    As often the context should be of some help.
    [CW]
  • Hi Gee, ingenious, inspired teacher, thank you for the free corrections! You helped me up, I was once more stuck.
    Eventually I agree with your translation and your proposal to write the sentence without comma.
    "Shall I stick to my guns"? A male language, gender problem. I've no guns. Is there any idiom in female or neutral language expressing the same thing?


    Have fun on weekend!
    C.w.
  • Yes indeed, Gwendo, even though being peaceful and unarmed, I can stick to my guns. I say: I can. I didn't say: I use to. The proof is that I here changed my mind.


    To stick to one's guns = to stand one's ground = to remain in place/to stick to one's own ideas (proper & figurative sense)

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