English Grammar


PRESENT PERFECT AND PAST SIMPLE

Could anybody explain to me when whe use the present perfet and when we use the past simple? I don't find it easy at all! Do you?
thanks fabio

15 comments - page 2

  • Present perfect and past simple, after the rule, now an example :


    "Although loneliness has always been a friend of mine, I’m leaving my life in your hands.
    Every little things that you have said an done feel like it’s deep within me.
    I have tried to hide it so that no one knows, but I guess it shows when you look into my eyes.
    People say I am crazy and that I am blind, risking it all in a glance.
    How you got me blind is still a mystery.
    I can’t get you out of my head."


    Who else has some nice example?
  • Past simple is PAST. Present perfect is PRESENT.


    A lot of people use past simple even with « just, ever, already and yet », whereas they are supposed to use present perfect according to some (all?) grammar books.


    - Did you eat already? Did you call your mom yet? You missed her. She just left.
    - Did you ever go to Europe? I never went there.


    They just use present perfect when necessary in order to make a link with the present.


    - Where have you been? - I worried about you.
    - Nowhere.
    - So where were you?
    - We went to go to see the movie. We have got to see it.
    __


    Are all these people stupid dummies?
    Hope not. I’m one of them!


    Did you ever find out such sentences here and then?
    Or am I the only one?
  • They are not dummies and neither are you but the tenses they and you use are not admitted "at school" or "at university" (which is why they don't appear in grammar books) although they are used by the Americans and by some people in Britain.I think it's better to stick to "strict rules" when you are are a beginner or pre-intermediate student,otherwise it is very confusing. Of course a fluent speaker like you can make sentences as the ones you mentioned above, especially in spoken English!
    English is far more flexible than French but I am pretty sure that the member of the forum who asked the question is likely to be puzzled by your answer even if it is good to know that the sentences you wrote can be heard.Then, you might reply: if they are heard why can't they be taught? Well, a bit too long to explain on this forum...
  • From Silky:
    They are not dummies and neither are you but the tenses they and you use are not admitted "at school" or "at university" (which is why they don't appear in grammar books) although they are used by the Americans and by some people in Britain.I think it's better to stick to "strict rules" when you are are a beginner or pre-intermediate student,otherwise it is very confusing. Of course a fluent speaker like you can make sentences as the ones you mentioned above, especially in spoken English!
    English is far more flexible than French but I am pretty sure that the member of the forum who asked the question is likely to be puzzled by your answer even if it is good to know that the sentences you wrote can be heard.Then, you might reply: if they are heard why can't they be taught? Well, a bit too long to explain on this forum...

     
  • YOUR EXPLICATION IS VERY SIMPLE I LIKE IT BUT ENGLISH GRAMMER IS VERY DIFFICULT


    FOR ME I HAVE SOME PROBLEMS IN PASS AND RESENT PERFECT NOW I LEARN MORE
  • me to you can to try its very easy you are begimers




    a see you later

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