English Vocabulary


calling for help on a theft spot

In my today's GG lesson, I get:
Bruno fired the intern on the spot.
Bruno fired the intern immediately after discovering that he had been stealing without.


I can't catch what that damn without is doing here?
Hope someone will be so kind to help me out.

1 comments

  • From Tom:
    In my today's GG lesson, I get:
    Bruno fired the intern on the spot.
    Bruno fired the intern immediately after discovering that he had been stealing without.


    I can't catch what that damn without is doing here?
    Hope someone will be so kind to help me out.

     
    Hi Tom,


    Up until now I hadn't replied to your request for I didn't know more than you about "what that damn "without" was doing there." And I was looking forward to getting an answer.


    As your request was filed 26 days ago, maybe you could learn more about it yet.
    For my part I've just made some research about it. Here you are with the results.


    The historical origin of the word comes from Old English. It's a compound made of with (avec)+ out (= outside, en dehors)


    Without has 4 possible grammatical status.
    - 1) PREPOSITION. Most GymGlishusers know it so.
    1a) lacking e.g. "a car without an engine."
    1b) in the absence of, e.g. "I answer your question without hesitation."
    1c) at the outside of, e.g. "walking outside the stadium".
    - 2) ADVERB.
    2a) on the outside,externally, e.g. "a nice house within and without."
    2b) with something lacking, e.g. about phonetic transcription "We have learned to do without."
    - 3) NOUN.
    an outer location or position, e.g. "a thief who came from without."
    - 4) (regional idiom) CONJUNCTION.
    unless, e.g. by Mark Twain: "You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer."


    You can now catch that in the sentence at stake, without is an adverb meaning "à l'extérieur".
    N.B. An intern is:
    1) A physician who has recently graduated from medical school and is learning medical practice in a hospital under supervision. More or less like in France "un interne des hôpitaux".
    2) A student or a recent graduate undergoing supervised practical training.(Bruno vira donc un stagiaire.)


    Thus, I suppose the dear intern that Bruno fired had been stealing outside of the premises of the Delavigne Corporation.


    Hoping this will be of some help.
    Gee


    By the way, Tom, have you something to do with Tom Sawyer?

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