English Idioms


Troubleshooting in the 45th lesson

Hi
I think there is a problem in this lesson (in the understanding part).
We have to "Select the TRUE statements from the list below. ".
I didn't check any of the answers and in the correction i'm right when the answer is false and i'm wrong when the answer is true!
Can you explain?
Thank you
Regards,
Aurelien

4 comments

  • I want to be so bold as to play the troubleshooter! (You must think of me: What a conceited man, that Gee!)


    It's a pure logic issue.


    The order is: "Select the TRUE statements from the list below."


    As long as you respond to the order by sending back the answers to the questions issued in the lesson, the system is right at considering that you are right by not selecting a false statement, and that you are wrong by not selecting the true statement.


    The conflict between you, Arelien, and the system comes from a different regard in the existence of a response or not. You considered you didn't respond to the order and the system considers you did! The problem doesn't stand into the order/respond area but beyond (or underhand as you prefer.)
  • From Aurelien.com:
    Hi
    I think there is a problem in this lesson (in the understanding part).
    We have to "Select the TRUE statements from the list below. ".
    I didn't check any of the answers and in the correction i'm right when the answer is false and i'm wrong when the answer is true!
    Can you explain?
    Thank you
    Regards,
    Aurelien

     
  • You might see it this way: The system has already claimed all answers as "false". You have to find out which answers are "true.


    The solution to this issue could be an introduction of a "three-state-control", as we call it in GUI software development - a so-called "radio buttion" with three states: 1. not selected(=don't know) 2. checked (=true), 2. unchecked (=false). This would solve the mismatch beetween user and system conception on the one hand, but would make the process more intricate on the other hand.


    Or: Two 2-states-radio-buttons per answer, one for "true", one for "false". Would makes things more clear, but more inconvenient, too.


    Having been a software developer for many years, I have to think in terms of software logic, I can't help it.


    Let's leave it how it is.
  • Sorry, I meant "3-state-checkbox" - it's the proper term.

Please sign in to leave a comment.