English Vocabulary


described by the subject

Hello to you on that clear sunny frosty november morning!


Would you please so kind to explain me the meaning of the following sentence, because I'm unsure about it:


-Typical workday, as described by the subject.-


Is "subject" a person in that case (Horatio), or a thing, a theme, an area of knowledge?


CW Gwendo

2 comments

  • 1)
    "I am early at work. First up I feed my monkeys. Then I start mixing all kinds of brewed herbs I had put on the back burner. I smell, it swells and jells, I yell! A painstaking but eventually rewarding task! Then I submit the flask to the chief-monkey. After deliberating with its fellow-monkeys, the latter generally nods, because I am one of a kind outstanding perfumes creator. All I still have to do until sunset is to feel pleased with my day work."
    This is a typical workday, as described by the subject.
    Who wouldn't guess the subject is Horatio himself?


    2)
    Horatio is early at work. First up he feeds his monkeys. Then he starts mixing all kinds of brewed herbs he had put on the back burner. He smells, it swells and jells, he yells! A painstaking but eventually rewarding task! Then he submits the flask to the chief-monkey. After deliberating with its fellow-monkeys, the latter generally nods, because Horatio is one of a kind outstanding perfumes creator. All Horatio still has to do until sunset is to feel pleased with his fabulous day work.
    Described as the subject of this latter excerpt, it was a typical workday of Horatio that you could get to know.


    Is that how you want it? or not? Cheerio, Gwendo.
    [CW]


    [CS: If I were you, I'd say: Would you please be so kind as to explain to me ... / or: Would you be kind enough to explain to me..]
  • Anyway Gee, you were kind enough to give me those both versions, included in my question. Before reading your answer I didn't think so far. Thanks again.


    CW Gwendo

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