English Grammar


something-anything/some-any

Does anyone need anything?
Can you pick up some herbal tea?
I don't have any money.


To my opinion in interrogative and negative constructions we must use any and anything instead of some and something.
Why is it correct to say "any money" but "some herbal tea"?

3 comments

  • If you were absolutely lacking of the slightest civility you could stick to your opinion, Cimbel.
    But by asking someone if they can pick up SOME herbal tea, you let know that you wouldn't be cross if they did. SOME instead of ANY in such a invitation is a token of politeness.


    I've been told you never drank any cup of tea at breakfast. But at this five-o'clock break, shall I pour you out SOME herbal tea?


    [If I said: ... may I pour you out any herbal tea? , I presume you would think I mean to offer you any kind of herbal tea, one at random, it doesn't matter if it were good, mild, strong or whatever.]


    Who doesn't agree is invited to tell it.
  • Anyone who agrees is invited to tell it as well.
  • That reminds me our Indian friend Terry Tafoya from New York who always concluded his conferences with:
    Are there any questions, or any answers?

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