English Vocabulary


hear of/hear about

Hello everybody!
I would like to know the difference between: "hear of" and "hear about"
Could you make a sentence with each one, as an example?
Thank you very much!

14 comments

  • Dear Ophelia, if you agree, I'll put down more than one sentence for each example.


    I've never heard of the Delavigne Corporation.
    Donna disappeared and was never heard of again.
    The last I heard of Philip he was living in San Francisco.
    This is the first I've heard of it.
    Polly wanted to walk home but Jean wouldn't hear of it.


    Have you heard about Susie getting married?
    Have you heard the one about the three monkeys? (concerning a particular joke before)
  • I hope this won't fall on deaf hears, I was wondering if the expression "to be heard" means the same thing as "to take the floor". Isn't it closer to the expression "to assert their views"?


    i.e.: "Thabo Masebe, spokesman for President Kgalema Motlanthe, said that it was inconvenient to allow the Dalai Lama to be heard at the conference."
  • Dear Gortence,


    I certainly won't turn a deaf hear to your sayings. But the matter is a bit difficult:


    If you start dancing on a dance floor, the floor for the last dance on Easter Monday, it's "take the floor"


    If the Dalai Lama has the right to speak during a debate, it's "get/have the floor",
    and if he speaks there for a long time so that nobody else is able to say anything,
    it's "hold the floor".
    So "to be heard at the conference" means the same thing as "to get/have/hold the floor".
    Or did you ever see the Dalai Lama dancing while he was speaking? I had better say: Did you ever hear the Dalai Lama speaking while he was dancing?
    I want to assert my right of being heard but not my views on this issue.
    CW
  • That being said, I'm quite certain that, if he gets the floor, he'll face the music! Thanks for your explanation Gwendo.
  • This humorous chat between two smart specialists being up at about whatever could be told over a waxed dance floor is so much enthralling that it couldn't fall on deaf ears in any way. No one would turn a deaf ear to it. Even the ones like me who are as deaf as a post are definitely all ears, melting.
  • Your are hearing a lot of me this week, isn't it?


    I found this on the Net : "They may never get their money back, but dozens of Bernie Madoff's victims want to get their two cents in when the accused Ponzi swindler appears in court Thursday for what's expected to be a guilty plea."


    Isn't is a charming way to say that the victims wanted to be heard?


    (I was wondering what was the "CW" thing at the end of a topic in this forum. I found an article on "continuous wave" on Wikipedia and I assume that was it: an invitation to engage in "conversation" in order to keep the wire alive. Am I right? )
  • It's a funny pun indeed to put side by side "not get their money back" but "get their two cents".
    But, Hortence, I don't read the sentence as you do.
    I think the sentence doesn't tell that the victims will have the floor on the court. They will GET their two cents in, they will learn about how the swindler managed to swindle them.
    To meet your interpretation, the sentence should read "....dozens of Bernie Madoff's victims want to GIVE their two cents in ..."
    What does that grab you, Hortence?


    The code CW is not a general digispeak item, it has been implemented by a GGuser going by the name of Silky some time ago for meaning Corrections Welcome. That Silky is probably on furlough by now for I overheard that she is working on a daily basis for a humanatarian aid organization named "pied nomade" (to te checked on internet).
    When I now and then suggest a correction to a GG co-learner I start it with CS, for Correction Suggested.
  • I was out at lunch then...
  • I caramba! Hortence will never forget what means to be out at lunch! Great!

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