English Vocabulary


hear of/hear about

Hello everybody!
I would like to know the difference between: "hear of" and "hear about"
Could you make a sentence with each one, as an example?
Thank you very much!

14 comments - page 2

  • Hi Gee, I don't know, I'm no specialist, neither otologist nor ophtalmologist. And I'm always delighted to read your new ideas everywhere in this forum.
    BTW Abrakadabra means: I'm creating ... while I'm speaking.
    (CW)
  • From Gee:
    I caramba! Hortence will never forget what means to be out at lunch! Great!

     


    Caramba? I've never heard of it. But I know Abrakadabra.
  • From Ophelia:
    Hello everybody!
    I would like to know the difference between: "hear of" and "hear about"
    Could you make a sentence with each one, as an example?
    Thank you very much!

     


    Hi Ophelia, Hi you all
    Saturday morning summary:


    hear about: to be told about something, to talk about getting some news--- Did you hear about the flight to the Saturn last night? Did you hear about Brian's accident?


    hear of: to indicate whether we know that somebody/something exists ---Who is Sam Shadetree? I've no idea. I've never heard of him.---You must have heard of the Anatomium. It's famous.


    hear from: talk about some communication(phone call, letter...): Have you heard from Lucky bastard? Yes I got an e-mail from him a few days ago.
    Have a nice weekend!
  • From Gee:
    It's a funny pun indeed to put side by side "not get their money back" but "get their two cents".
    But, Hortence, I don't read the sentence as you do.
    I think the sentence doesn't tell that the victims will have the floor on the court. They will GET their two cents in, they will learn about how the swindler managed to swindle them.
    To meet your interpretation, the sentence should read "....dozens of Bernie Madoff's victims want to GIVE their two cents in ..."
    What does that grab you, Hortence?


    The code CW is not a general digispeak item, it has been implemented by a GGuser going by the name of Silky some time ago for meaning Corrections Welcome. That Silky is probably on furlough by now for I overheard that she is working on a daily basis for a humanatarian aid organization named "pied nomade" (to te checked on internet).
    When I now and then suggest a correction to a GG co-learner I start it with CS, for Correction Suggested.

     
  • From Gwendo:


    Caramba? I've never heard of it. But I know Abrakadabra.

     


    I caramba!
    Now that Obama is striking closer and softer relations with Mexicans and other South America leaders, even extreme left ones, you are right to wonder whether this move has brought in more Spanish words into American language. As a matter of fact, Mexicans have made for long the margest number of immigrants in USA. I recently heard that one out of six illegal immigrants in USA were Mexicans. Among them a majority of drugs and weapons smugglers. You probably noticed, as I did, that the GG lessons are full of Spanish expressions coming now and again in characters' cues.


    So, caramba is Spanish.
    I guess it is not an every day expression across the channel but it must be across the Atlantic. I heard USA citizens say "I caramba!", meaning "O my goodness!" or something of that kind.


    Good to you, Gwendo, to know abracadabra, to use it on a regular basis, that means that you often get magical surprises! You are blessed.


    By the by, I am so pleased to read you again.It was a long time we hadn't heard from you. (Is that 'hear from' correct?)
    [CW]

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