English Vocabulary


flood - float

I wonder if these two words have a common root. In German we can say: Licht (light) flutete durch das Zimmer. (flood) In English they prefer float:
The sounds of piano playing floated from the open window.
Where can I find the etymology of the words. Do you have some hints for me?
Thanks in advance.

14 comments

  • According to what I read in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary which I think is one out of the best for finding origin of words,


    FLOAT
    The Middle English "flote" (for boat or float) comes from Old English "flota" (ship) which is akin to Old High English flooz (raft or stream) and Old English "fleeotan" (to float).
    FLEET
    has a similar origin Middle English "flete", Old English "fleot" (ship)


    I don't think the origin of FLOOD is exactly the same.
    Old English "flood", akin to Old English "floowan" (to flow).


    Which links can be set between "to flow" and "a ship"? They aren't from totally unknown for each other worlds.
    The roots of words even found in separate boxes don't seem to come from nailed shut boxes.


    But anyway the nicest saying I found in your tip was:
    "Licht flutete durch das Zimmer." It overcomes any possible English say.
    However I'd like to point out that in English I could say:
    "The room was flooded in light." or
    "The light flowed through/into the room." or
    "The light sank into the room."
    but surely not "floated" as you suggested.


    Warning: I wrote oo the o coming with an "upperscore" in OE for the software didn't implement such stress.
    [CW]
  • The sound of music can float from an open window.
    Sound: waves of air particles (matter); It can float imitationg water particles.
    Light can't float, I think. It's an electromagnetic radiation.
    We may though imagine light as streaming, beaming, not floating.
    What does it grab you?
  • From Gee:
    According to what I read in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary ....
    They aren't from totally unknown for each other worlds.
    ... for the software didn't implement such stress.
    [CW]

     
    CS "They are not from worlds totally unknown to each other." (I feel it flows easier so.)


    for the software hasn't implemented such stress. (Hasn't implemented seems better to me as it is still likely to do.)


    In your last message posted at 11:30AM:
    What does IT grab you? I have never heard IT so far but THAT:
    What does that grab you?


    What do you think, Gee? (and others!)
  • Many thanks Sandy!
    Thanks for calling on.
    Thanks for reading.
    Thanks for fixing.


    About "what does that grab you?", it's right I learned it with "that" in the GG lessons. But does it mean we shouldn't go deviant - grammatically I mean, not sexually. Do you mean I should nail myself in a shut box?


    By the by, why wouldn't you float an idea now and then?
  • Hello Gee,


    thanks a lot for your intensive investighations concerning my question. I have to work it through during my holidays. As You know, I still need many hours to translate your statements because my lack of advanced vocabulary. I beg your patience (does that work like I beg your pardon? Or should I say: I would like to ask you for patience, help, understanding? In any case I'm very interested in such refexions and I'll grab the big chance you offer with both hands.


    (CW)


    From Gee:
    According to what I read in the Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary which I think is one out of the best for finding origin of words,


    FLOAT
    The Middle English "flote" (for boat or float) comes from Old English "flota" (ship) which is akin to Old High English flooz (raft or stream) and Old English "fleeotan" (to float).
    FLEET
    has a similar origin Middle English "flete", Old English "fleot" (ship)


    I don't think the origin of FLOOD is exactly the same.
    Old English "flood", akin to Old English "floowan" (to flow).


    Which links can be set between "to flow" and "a ship"? They aren't from totally unknown for each other worlds.
    The roots of words even found in separate boxes don't seem to come from nailed shut boxes.


    But anyway the nicest saying I found in your tip was:
    "Licht flutete durch das Zimmer." It overcomes any possible English say.
    However I'd like to point out that in English I could say:
    "The room was flooded in light." or
    "The light flowed through/into the room." or
    "The light sank into the room."
    but surely not "floated" as you suggested.


    Warning: I wrote oo the o coming with an "upperscore" in OE for the software didn't implement such stress.
    [CW]

     
  • You needn't to beg any patience of anyone, Gwendo, because everyone is pleased to talk with you.
    'I beg your pardon' is an everyday idiomatic expression.
    Would 'to beg someone's patience' a acceptable expression, I don't know. But why not? Understandable by everyone anyway.
    Be patient, Gwendo, with the passing of time, we'll know.
  • Hi Gee!
    You wrote: 'Warning: I wrote oo the o coming with an 'upperscore' in OE for the software hasn't implemented such stress.'


    I apologize, but I need some explanations about what this sentence means. Maybe my English is not as good as I've been thinking. I don't understand this sentence completely. In particular, I don't understand "I wrote oo the o coming with an upperscore in OE"


    Could you please explain it? Thanks in advance
  • Hello Uderzo,
    There is no need to apologize for anything. I rather have to thank you for reading and looking further.


    OE is for Old English (from 500 until 1150 A.D.)


    In Old English there were some ways of writing vowels that are no longer used in today's English. In the point at stake I wrote as "OO" the letter "O topped with a horizontal line". As you surely know, that topping line is a pronunciation symbol meaning in most languages that the vowel is "long" (like in boot, look, toe, foe..). I don't know what's the word for that sign. I suppose there is one though. If you do know, I'd be pleased to learn it.


    Be Okay on this May Day.
  • Well, I’ve never learned Latin or any other language, which uses an upperscore to indicate
    a stretched vowel, and, up to know, I’ve never heard of it. I might be embarrassing, but
    better ask than remain “stupid”. Thanks for the explanation.


    The syntax of the sentence was confusing to me. But know it’s clear:
    "I wrote ‘oo’ instead of the ‘o’ coming with an upperscore in OE."


    Have a nice evening.

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