English Vocabulary


not already signed up?

What could that be? My e-card program asked me that question.
I only know "sign in" in this context.

27 comments

  • Some workers must sign in as they come in to work. As a matter of fact they don't actually sign in, they check in electronically.
    Travellers are used to sign in at the reception desk of the hotel at arrival.
    In my dictionary, they say that sign in is also used to mean hand back a book to the library or something that kind.


    If I get hired by a company, I say that I sign up/ they say they sign me up.
    Some years ago I signed up at the GymGlish.


    About your e-card program, Gwendo, is it that you could sign up for something?
  • "to sign in" is more customary for example if you put your name into a list or if you leave your name in a guestbook.


    I know the term "to sign up" in three meanings, and Gee is right.


    The first has a is a similar meaning liker "to register" and "to sign up" on the more colloquial way to express it. In every day life, you would say "I signed him up at the boy scouts" instead "I registered him at the boy scouts".


    The second meaning is the act of putting your "signature" under a contract. "to sign up a contract" (=to accept and conclude a contract by "signing" it). But, as far as I know, you can also say "to sign a contract".


    Does anyone know around here whether "to sign a contract" and "to sign up a contract" have the same meaning and can be uses interchangeable?


    The third one has the meaning of hiring somebody. If you get a job at a company, the company "signs you up". This meaning was esspecially used in seafaring in former days, sailors "signed up" at a ship.


    Until now, I haven't heard of the fourth meaning that Gee mentioned (to bring back a borrowed book to a library), but it's interesting and maybe I've missed something.


    I guess "to sign up" in the meaning of "to register" and "to hire" enemates from "signature", the act of signing a contract, hence it seems that "to sign a contract" is the origin meaning.
  • hi
  • hi, what's up?
  • Hello, in that forum we can always learn a lot of good things by You the advanced learners! Thanks a lot for your very intesting answers.
  • Yes indeed, Cordelia, it would be very tiring, hard and boring for us, the beginners, to do all that work alone.
    So thank you all, you advanced learners, for giving us a hand.
  • Hi Cordelia, Hi Sevda,


    You can say that again!
    If they hadn't been here, I don't know what I would have done. I hope they'll never really going to leave us.




    Hi Gee, Hi Uderzo,


    Sorry, I don't quite follow you. Could you run through that again please? Would you mind putting it another way?


    CW

  • Sorry, I don't quite follow you. Could you run through that again please? Would you mind putting it another way?


    CW

     


    Yes, of course can : "sign up" is OK in that context, "sign in" is not. Any further information is not free of charge, please send 15$ to ....
  • From Gwendo:
    Hi Cordelia, Hi Sevda,


    You can say that again!
    If they hadn't been here, I don't know what I would have done. I hope they'll never really going to leave us.

     
    Oh, I forgot: You'll never get rid of me! Hide in the
    most remote corner of the inernet - I'll
    be waiting for you which answers to
    questions you've never asked!
    Because I'm the all-knowing scrap heap!

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