English Idioms


Impossible to translate !

Where did YOU learn ME the meaning of "name-calling" ? My dictionnary doesn't know it either....
And it costs me 8 points ! That's a bit expensive, friends.
I'm not happy.


Jackie

11 comments

  • Now's the time to throw a name-calling in their face and at that point to throw your dictionary to the trashcan. That should make you happy, Jackie!
  • Jackie's dictionary didn't want Jackie to be rude. It didn't list name-calling as a headword. For sure it made do with mentioning it as a compound-name under the word "name".
    Keep a tight hold on your precious dictionary, Jackie. Even though nothing is perfect, everything may be worth helping.
    Anyway, 8 points for 11 letters, that's a mere trifle.
    Keep up the hard work!
  • Name-calling is repulsive and absolutely unnecessary.
    I will never understood why people don't manage
    to use a decent, appropriate vocabulary and avoid naughty
    and insulting words. In our high-sophisticated society speak politely and kindly to each other and avoid all filthy words and any kind of violence, including verbal violence.




    Why don't we throw this fucking, goddammed dictionary away
    and slap all these motherfucking asholes, pricks and sons-of-a-bitch in the face who can express themselves decenlty? I'll be the first line to kick all this oafish pricks in the ass.
    when they don't behave properly.


    For the censorship: Don't be indignant, this is social satire.
  • Fuck and blimey, I'm such an imbecile moron. I've made a mistake:


    "I will never UNDERSTAND (not UNDERSTOOD)..."
    and
    "In our high-sophisticated society WE SHOULD TALK..."


    Why doesn't have this ... forum a correction functionality
    for nitwits like me?


    Please, my dear friends, always keep this in mind: Name-calling is not acceptable in any situation.
  • We were flabbergasted by the writing of a great author. Loretta is not only a good writer, she is satirical on good manners, humorous with name-calling of any kind, moralist for the sake of form, merciless with rascals, and above all she is an outstanding teacher for the great many abecederians roaming here around.
    We are looking forward to reading Loretta more often.
  • Frankly, I can’t really tell what you are trying to pull here, Gee.


    Depending on how it is meant, I haven’t either read that much mocking irony in ages
    and I’m really dissappointed about my failed attempt to come across as I intended to – or I have every reason to feel flattered.


    I tend to assume the first. So there is stonge chance that I'll never write anything here again - to my and everybody's relief, unless I can serve as a bad example yet.
  • I am so sorry you took my say on the wrong side. Please take me for granted, Loretta, and disregard my tip.
  • Wow, Gee, another example for the perfect irony. Very subtle, but offending. Congratulations! You’re becoming more and more yourself.
    Do you have many dates? I can’t imagine.
  • Here is a translation of the fable The Crow And The Fox by a French Jean, neither Jean Marron, nor Jean Moron, but the Jean sitting close by a fountain.


    Master Crow perched on a tree,
    Was holding a cheese in his beak.
    Master Fox attracted by the smell
    Said something like this:
    "Well, Hello Mister Crow!
    How beautiful you are! how nice you seem to me!
    Really, if your voice
    Is like your plumage,
    You are the phoenix of all the inhabitants of these woods."
    At these words, the Crow is overjoyed.
    And in order to show off his beautiful voice,
    He opened his beak wide, let his prey fall
    The Fox grabbed it, and said: "My good man,
    Learn that every flatterer
    Lives at the expense of the one who listens to him.
    This lesson, without doubt, is well worth a cheese."
    The Crow, ashamed and embarrassed,
    Swore, but a little late, that he would not be taken again.


    Who is master Crow?
    He might be Jean Marron.
    He couldn't be a fair lady, for fair ladies never succumb to flatterers.


    Here is another version of the fable.


    Lady Crow wandering on the forum beach
    Was uttering a melodious speech
    About how to behave in a fair company
    How to address everyone cheerfully,
    Banish name-calling from one's vocabulary
    And make it out so that everyone be happy.
    An earthworm nearby crawling
    Found the Crow's speech amazing
    And thought she was worth congratulating.
    "Your speech is wonderful, he said,
    Thanks to you there are good times ahead.
    Swearword will give way to politeness
    So that life get brightness."
    Lady crow couldn't stand being praised
    By a crawling loser by her speech completely crazed.
    "You Tartuffe," she spat out at the loser,
    "Your villainousness doesn't clear you to be a forum user.
    Shut up, obnoxious adulator
    You're a too bad actor."
    The earthworm, ashamed and embarrassed,
    Swore, but a little late, that he would never show up again.


    [CW]

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