English Grammar


mixed conditional (SOS)

hiii i have some problems with mixed conditional can anyone help me??

7 comments

  • As your question has been pending for some days yet, that proves few people are able to answer or interested in.
    I for one don't think to be well up on grammar. Since I didn't even know what a mixed conditional was. I think that, unless you are or intend to become an teacher in English, the best way to learn grammar is the practice, not so much the rules. Anyway, thanks to the chit you posted, I went and looked for some explanation. Here are the results of my quest.


    A mixed conditional (somehow short for 'a mixed conditional sentence') seems to be a sentence made up of a conditional clause and a main clause (expressing what is depending on the condition), those clauses being in different grammar tenses.


    As long as I understood what I read, there is only one type of conditional sentence that can never be a mixed conditional. They call that a "zero conditional".
    The zero conditional is a structure used for talking about general truths.
    The conditional clause AND the main clause (result of an ever fulfilled condition) are in the simple present.
    If it rains, the road is wet.
    When the sun shines, the daisies open.
    The bullet is shot if the trigger is pulled.




    Mixed conditionals MAY apply to any other types of conditional sentences.




    Type 1: The conditional sentence called "First conditional" expresses a condition which is a REAL possibility in the present or in the future.
    *conditional clause in the present – main clause in the future*


    If I catch that train, I will have some spare time.
    If the bus is packed, I will go on foot.
    I will be happy if you catch my say.
    If you write a word, I will read it.


    [Warning: Type 1 may also be a non-mixed conditional: (present - present)
    If Tom phones, tell him I'm here.
    Should Tom phone, tell him I'm in. (smaller possibility)]




    Type 2: The “Second conditional” deals with UNREAL situations in the present or in the future.
    *Conditional clause in the past – main clause in the present i.e. present conditional tense*


    If I had 2 bucks, I would buy a loaf of bread. (Since I do not have the money I cannot buy it).
    If I were you, I would buy a good grammar book.
    If pigs had wings, they could fly.




    Type 3 :The third conditional talks about UNREAL SITUATIONS IN THE PAST; things at stake did not happen; since the main clause has been impossible.
    *Conditional clause in the past perfect – main clause in the present perfect conditional*


    If I had worked harder, I probably would have passed the exam.
    If I had had 2 bucks, I would have bought a loaf of bread. (But I did not have it, and so I was left keeping starving).
    If I had eaten less, I would not have become obese.
    If we had chosen the right way, I could have reached my goal.






    Additional type: WISH sentences.
    Wish sentences are sometimes mixed.
    A wish expresses a desire for a situation that does not exist for the moment.
    As
  • This is not the answer of a helpful man, it's
    the answer of an ashole, an old (likely impotent)
    geezer, who only pretends to be helpful and modest.
    But in fact he is nothing but a conceited braggart,
    who deems himself interlectual and wants to make
    impression.
  • ...addressed to "Gee", got it?
  • Persons like you, Gee, should be EXPELLED
    from GymGlish and this forum for good.


    You are constantly spoiling the camaradiere and
    cooperation in this forum and deter other learners
    from asking questions and posting their opinions.
  • Dear zony, please explain the term "mixed conditional". I couldn't find it in my grammers. Please give us an example!


    From zony:
    hiii i have some problems with mixed conditional can anyone help me??

     
  • From Snuggle:
    This is not the answer of a helpful man, it's
    the answer of an ashole, an old (likely impotent)
    geezer, who only pretends to be helpful and modest.
    But in fact he is nothing but a conceited braggart,
    who deems himself interlectual and wants to make
    impression.

     


    Fine to me, Snuggle. The asshole hasn't to be fired. He leaves off his own. He just feels sorry for himself. He wishes you had yourself a snuggle in order you feel peacefull.
  • What is a mixed conditional, please?

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