English Grammar


It's the following grammatically correct?

"Yesterday at 12 o'clock sharp, my train left the station on platform
23. At that very instant I was hurrying up the main road in my
damaged car. One hour ago I had an accident which
left me fortunately unhurt, but my car looked appropriately."


I reckon this am example of how to use the past continuous
and simple past tense correclty and it shows, how both can be
distinguished. Whereas the first action is not an action in progress,
we use the simple past tense, even though it happens at a specific
time, the second action is a classic example for a past action in progress
at a specific time, hence it is expressed in past continuous.


I'm not sure about the 3rd action, which is expressed the simple past here.
But, since it happens before the specified time, is it also correct to use the past perfect?


"One hour ago I've had an accident..."


[CW]

6 comments

  • The caption is incorrect in any case: IS THE FOLLOWING GRAMMATICALLY CORRECT?
  • Good day, Serendipity.
    1. At first sight, I thought you were a surrealistic being provided with ubiquity. Yes indeed, yesterday at 12 sharp, YOUR train left a station and at the same time you were hurrying up a road by car!


    2. MY question: I wonder what means appropriately in this context.
    Is the car still appropriate to driving? Or is the car in the expected appropriate condition to go for scrap?


    3. YOUR concern about the tense in the 3rd action:
    'One hour ago' being a precise moment in the past, you must say I HAD an accident (simple past).
    At 11:30 you crashed you car.
    Yesterday I got up early.


    But in the last months, I have had an accident. (non precise moment)




    Suppose you are telling something that - as you told - has happened before a specified time:
    Before this very moment as we are chatting, I have had an accident yet (nothing says it was yesterday at 12 sharp or whenever).
    Before we met with each other, I had had an accident (somewhere sometime in the past.)


    Is it true? Is it untrue. Guess.
    Wish you many returns of the day.
  • Who could help me in this matter and give a decent and objective answer?
  • P.S. Gee, you've proved that you are witty and
    intelligent. But the purpose of this forum
    is NOT to perform oneself and to make fun of other users.
    I was asking a decent and objective question and if you're
    not able to give a decent answer, you shouldn't response at all.


    This is an forum for people who want to learn from one another.
  • Goodness gracious me! Me, the only one who took the trouble to give Serendpity's question a follow-up, I find myself criticized, blamed, pilloried! That's blatant iniquity!
    That blatant iniquity is a pity, Serendipity.


    You helped me realize that I am an old geezer, totally off the mark, splitting hair, and more. As one of your GG-mates going by the name of Snuggle told me that I should be expelled, I decided not to bug anyone any longer and purely and simply to bug out. This text is my last one, the last say of a sentenced to death guy.


    My last say is confirmation of what I told you yet:


    1. If I had been you, Serendipity, I would have written:


    Here are 3 sentences:
    ° Yesterday at 12 o'clock sharp, my train left the station on platform 23.
    ° At that very instant I was hurrying up the main road in my damaged car.
    ° One hour ago I had an accident which left me fortunately unhurt, but my car looked appropriately."


    2. I am left to guess what you mean by saying that your car looked appropriately. You refused to tell me. I'll be living with that pending concern all my life long.




    3. Your comments about the 3rd sentence were accurate, with one restriction. You shouldn't say "Whereas the first action is not an action in progress, we use the simple past tense, EVEN THOUGH it happens at a specific time,..." rather say:
    "Whereas the first action is not an action in progress, we use the simple past tense, BECAUSE it happens at a specific time,..."


    One hour ago, you had an accident. (You may not HAVE HAD an accident one hour ago).


    *English uses the PAST SIMPLE - or PAST CONTINUOUS if necessary - to tell, report, relate, refer to an event (fact or action) that happened in the past and which is over, completed, finished.
    Ex.:
    When the train entered the station, it blew its whistle.
    Yesterday we ate potatoes.
    Last week the weather was sunny.
    At 3 o'clock this morning, I woke up.
    In the Middle Ages humans were shorter than they are nowadays.
    We went abroad four times last year.


    As a child I was often ill.(repeated completed action)
    As a child I was playing socer every day (emphasizing the repetition of a finished action)


    Last time I met him, he was shuffling along.
    In 1929 many people were struggling for life.
    I was reading when she came in.




    NB : If the fact lasted for some time, but is by now completely finished, you must use the past simple in the same way.
    Ex. :
    From 1999 to 2003, we lived in California.
    In the nineties bread price was cheap.




    *English uses the PRESENT PERFECT
    a) to refer to an event or state that is not finished now, or that has some connection with the present (It is perfect and present at the same time.)
    Ex. :
    From the last economic downturn, loans have shrinked.
    Since last week the weather has been sunny. (the sun is still shining.)
    He hasn't been able to walk since he had a car accident.


    Let
  • My car looked appropriately?
    You think it's possible? Or should it be "appropriate"?

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