English Vocabulary


to be bound to

It was marked as a bad choice saying "Kevin's holiday in Thailand is bound to begin on Wednesday." It should be said instead '...begins on Wednesday'.
But I've sensed the phrase as "Kevin's holiday in Thailand has to begin on Wednesday (since a contract maybe)." Why can't I interpret that in this way?

3 comments

  • Sorry for a bug: It was bound to happen! (there a bad extra 'to' in the message I have just posted)


    As I was a bit distracted, that bug was bound to happen.
  • Why not your choice? I guess it must be correct, on a grammatical basis, but I presume it's a bit awkward to use 'to be bound to' about holidays, as the expression implies an obligation or a commitment.


    Though 'to be bound to' is commonly used for things or events like:
    It was to bound to happen !
    Horatio's recipes are bound to be disclosed.
    E-books are bound to fail.
    My vernal decisions on this March 21 are bound to fail.
    With such a pretty name capablanca is bound to go in a white cloak.


    As for me I'd prefer your sentence to go this way:
    Kevin is bound to go on holiday in July.
    or, as you said, capablanca,
    Kevin's holidays are to begin on Wednesday.


    Just my feelings.
  • It was marked as a bad choice saying "Kevin's holiday in Thailand is bound to begin on Wednesday." It should be said instead '...begins on Wednesday'.
    But I've sensed the phrase as "Kevin's holiday in Thailand has to begin on Wednesday (since a contract maybe)." Why can't I interpret that in this way?

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