The Delavigne Corporation


woman with the candles : But Why ?

Bonjour,
I'd like to know why Horatio names Luna "The woman with the candles". A matter of earrings ?
Cordially

13 comments

  • Luna De Lune, as her name suggests, is very swaying according to the moon phases. She is quite irrational. She is likely to spend hours meditating upon zodiac matters or alternative ways of living by candlelight. She has always a bunch of candles on her desk.
  • Thank you for the answer that's precise and clear.
    So professional that I come to wonder about your name : Joe the screwball. Aren't you, you too, swaying according to the moon Phases ?
    Anyway, the main point of this message is Thanks a lot
    Cordially, as we say in my company.
  • yes, we could perhaps call him a lunatic, but we must be careful; not so many GG team members accept to contribute to the forum : Willy / Joe, are there some others ? I am not quite sure or perhaps under nicknames which would let think they are customers !
  • You might be a negationist of WW1, dear pal.
    But you may not turn negationist of a hard-working customer of my kind who has been Gymglishing for many years yet. If I turned screwball, it's due to my mates who called me names when I started the GymGlish. The nickname Joe, I stole it myself from the average American citizen. I confess it was a robbery for I am a pure native European. Whatever you can think, I want to tell you that I am delighted to read you. Drop in more often, Nego.
  • Hey ! Joe, I have a song for you:
    Oh Screwball was a racehorse, and I wish he were mine.
    He never drank water, he always drank wine.
    His bridle was silver, his mane it was gold.
    And the worth of his saddle has never been told.
    Oh the fairgrounds were crowded, and Screwball was there
    But the betting was heavy on the bay and the mare.
    As they were approaching about half way around,
    the grey mare she stumbled, and fell to the ground.
    And a-way up yonder, ahead of them all,
    Came a-prancin' and a-dancin' my noble Screwball.
    I bet on the grey mare, I bet on the bay
    If I'd have bet on ol' Screwball, I'd be a free man today.
    Oh the hoot owl, she hollers, and the turtle dove moans.
    I'm a poor boy in trouble, I'm a long way from home.
    Oh Screwball was a racehorse, and I wish he were mine.
    He never drank water, he always drank wine.
  • He was taken aback.
    Never got such a gift.
    A poem written by a prominent threesome,
    a poem prepared with the most delicious rhymes,
    a poem meant to give a nerd some dream of hope and glory.
    In his horsebox, Screwball is tossing and turning, pawing the ground, chewing over wild thoughts about either having been had, or being a winner.
    Poor Screwball ! He now has to know the poem by heart, so as to stay self-confident... a hard task for a screwball.
  • Good Afternoon, Mr Joe.
    I am sorry, Negationist has an “a” not an “o” like in Nego : I cannot be a negationist. You say you are a pure native European and you write pure english and american too. You started the GG but you do not seem to need it to improve your english, you seem to be on the forum only for fun.
    It is not my case ! The alias who entered the nickname Negoww1 said : “You have an old way of thinking and you have black ideas, we cannot write together in the forum; but I give you a chance, I will call you the ‘not ego from the World War I’ if GG system allows ”.
    So we can share the lessons and I must say I enjoy very much hearing from Harold P. Warbuckle, my favorite character in Delavigne Corp. Like him, I shoot first and then think if I have time left. It is true GG lessons make users improve and not only their english. Through the wars and the thirty glorious years, I had been applying this principle in fighting and business. But since I met Philip Cheeter, I made up my mind, soon I will be the Number One Negociator in the Wild West.
    Yours faithfully, Capitaine Nego.
  • So happy my candles lit such a brilliant light.
    (wonder wether lit is ok or not, but it sounds almost Shakesperian, so ...)
  • By the way, I first heard Stewball by Willie Dixon on Deutsch Grammophon American Folk blues festival (1962). Peter Paul and Mary are probably nice fellows, but the strength of this German album hit me as few albums did. (I was 12 and had elder brothers who loved good music at the time ...)
    Google tells me that this song comes from Ireland, around 1790, and that the horse's name was Skewbald.
    And my (poor) memory sings me that he was a black horse, and blind too. And that's where the Blues is (hmm, hmm)

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