English Grammar


to (me) vs for (me)

Here are 3 statements.
(1) I have him as a master.
(2) He is as a master to me.
(3) He is like a master for me.
(4) He is like a master to me.


Don't you think (1) and (2) are two different ways telling the same?


To my mind, (3) has another meaning. As he is 'like a master' means that his behaviour, his position towards me look like the ones a master would have; but he is not my master.


My key question is about (4).
Has (4) exactly the same meaning as (3) ?
Or does 'to me' refer to my opinion? such as in this structure: '(According) to me, he is like a master.'


Thanks in advance.

2 comments

  • Hell's bells! What an idea I had, marking the sentences with a figure between brackets. I should have used bullets, or better, square boxes so as to make the list look like a GymGlish exercise. And I would have got 75% marks, sentence (2) shining bright red, being told false because unfamiliar, weird and faulty.


    Sharp head, you Whacky! What a boon you are for every GG forum regulars! You are like a teacher for everyone, and as a last resort you are there to help anyone. You are an expert generously helping the needy. Be you sincerely thanked, Whacky.


    I am proud to think like you about sentence (4). It can't be taken as being the same as 'To me, he is like a master', the latter meaning 'To my mind, he resembles a master.' (Just what everyone down here thinks about the Whacky.)


    I should be ashamed for having written sentence (2). If I am not, it's just because I am a screwball.
    But nonetheless I won't say any longer that you are (**) a master to me. I'll say you are a master to me. If you don't speak as the class teacher, you speak like a master for any regular down this forum. That's groovy, groovy.
  • Here are 3 statements.
    (1) I have him as a master.
    (2) He is as a master to me.
    (3) He is like a master for me.
    (4) He is like a master to me.


    Don't you think (1) and (2) are two different ways telling the same?


    To my mind, (3) has another meaning. As he is 'like a master' means that his behaviour, his position towards me look like the ones a master would have; but he is not my master.


    My key question is about (4).
    Has (4) exactly the same meaning as (3) ?
    Or does 'to me' refer to my opinion? such as in this structure: '(According) to me, he is like a master.'


    Thanks in advance.

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