English Vocabulary


from Orwell's 1984

I had to read it 40 years ago and found my teacher whacky...I read it now and thanks the wise man...but, could you help me get the meaning of the word baulks in "Were there always these vistas of rotting nineteenth-century houses, their sides shored up with balks of timber..."

8 comments

  • The rotting 19th century houses needed to get shored up (*) by means of wooden beams.


    (*) to shore up is to hold, to support to prevent a collapse.


    A balk, as a noun in this sentence, means a large piece of wood like a beam.
    Timber here is the kind of wood, the matter used for beams, rafters, etc. in construction.
  • Thank you very much : indeed I hadn't got it that way. Have a nice day - Ugoid
  • 1984 my youth ! I mean, it's what i was reading in my youth trying to tame english language.
    Thanks for the flash back even if I don't remenber the "balustrade" episode.
    So thnaks a lot yu two.
    Vict.
  • 1984 my youth ! I mean, it's what i was reading in my youth trying to tame english language.
    Thanks for the flash back even if I don't remenber the "balustrade" episode.
    So thnaks a lot yu two.
    Vict.
  • Yo, Victorine. There is no balustrade in sight on these rotting houses. Even though a balustrade is likely made of timber, you shoudn't mistake a balk for a balustrade.
    But you are possibly right dreaming of a balustrade as far as you don't lean out too far. We need you so much.
  • War is peace / freedom is slavery / ignorance is strength / big brother and Joe are watching you.
  • Yes, Joe is watching you - from his balustrade. Don't lean out to far, Joe. We need you here. Everybody has to fulfill his role, if he likes it or not.
  • teasing me watch-men ? balustrade, balcony, beam.... you prefer frame ??? i feel confused, all these pieces of wood for an urban dame!
    Thanks for my new strength... i'll read you with pleasure in 2011 if y'll survive until then.
    V.

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