English Idioms


"drive up the wall"

In Susie Meets The Mayor (Scene 7 of 7) an the idiom "drive up the wall" is used in this way:
"He's driving my wife and I up the wall."


I'm just wondering if that is correct.


I would say it must be "He's driving my wife and .. ME .. up the wall.


Has anybody an idea why it is used in this way?

3 comments

  • Who is that maniac driving people up the wall?
    You were right wondering if that was correct. Of course not, it is not fair, not courteous, not correct to make people angry. I also wonder why that man was driving the wife and her husband up the wall.


    If was the wife's husband, I'd say:
    "He's driving my wife and ME up the wall."
    As a plain screwball, I consider the wife and myself as direct objects of 'is driving'. My wife and I, we are driven up the wall.


    Now what can we conjecture about that first person 'I'?


    First hypothesis: the speaker could consider the wife and husband are actually climbing up a wall! They should be the subjects of the action of moving up the wall. Haha! Probably not true.


    Better hypothesis: the 'I' is a way for the speaker to feel important and show up.
    'He's driving my wife and I - can you figure out? I ! myself here in front of you - up to the wall.'


    Let's hope, Mat73, that a Whacky drops by. He is the only one I know up to such issue.
    Keep up the good work and don't worry about a man's whim.
  • Sorry, sorry, Mat73. Proofreading my text I find out 2 big bugs. But I know you will be understanding.
    line 4 : If I was ....
    last but 2 line : ... in front of you - up the wall.
  • They were painting the wall, but in which color? probably one which makes people mad just to look at, but together or not, that is the question
    Vic.
    ,

    From Joe the screwball:
    Who is that maniac driving people up the wall?
    You were right wondering if that was correct. Of course not, it is not fair, not courteous, not correct to make people angry. I also wonder why that man was driving the wife and her husband up the wall.


    If was the wife's husband, I'd say:
    "He's driving my wife and ME up the wall."
    As a plain screwball, I consider the wife and myself as direct objects of 'is driving'. My wife and I, we are driven up the wall.


    Now what can we conjecture about that first person 'I'?


    First hypothesis: the speaker could consider the wife and husband are actually climbing up a wall! They should be the subjects of the action of moving up the wall. Haha! Probably not true.


    Better hypothesis: the 'I' is a way for the speaker to feel important and show up.
    'He's driving my wife and I - can you figure out? I ! myself here in front of you - up to the wall.'


    Let's hope, Mat73, that a Whacky drops by. He is the only one I know up to such issue.
    Keep up the good work and don't worry about a man's whim.




     

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