English Grammar


English subjunctive

Hello,


I've got a question concerning English subjunctive. Sometimes, I see the "do" auxiliairy verb in negative subjunctive forms, sometimes I do not. Let me be more precise by asking you which of the two sentences below is correct... (they're both inspired by a GymGlish lesson I've had today).


- We ask that you do not invite an 'outside' technical specialist to interfere with our system.
- We ask that you not invite an 'outside' technical specialist to interfere with our system.


See? I'm wondering how come I can see the "do" auxiliary in the first sentence, while from what I've learnt about subjunctive forms, the second sentence should be correct...


Thank you in advance.

3 comments

  • From felixm:
    Hello,


    I've got a question concerning English subjunctive. Sometimes, I see the "do" auxiliairy verb in negative subjunctive forms, sometimes I do not. Let me be more precise by asking you which of the two sentences below is correct... (they're both inspired by a GymGlish lesson I've had today).


    - We ask that you do not invite an 'outside' technical specialist to interfere with our system.
    - We ask that you not invite an 'outside' technical specialist to interfere with our system.


    See? I'm wondering how come I can see the "do" auxiliary in the first sentence, while from what I've learnt about subjunctive forms, the second sentence should be correct...


    Thank you in advance.

     
  • Hi Happy man,


    The negative form of a subjunctive does not use the auxiliary 'do'. I think that in your examples, only the second sentence is correct in a formal language because it is made with a present subjunctive.


    I bet that the first sentence is less formal. It doesn't use a subjunctive as it probably is an every day way of speaking.


    Yours,
    Joe
  • Oh okay, then I understand. Just different ways of speaking. Thanks!

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