English Idioms


(May Day) hating fascist !

Quelle serait la traduction de hating fascist ?
Si on le demande à Gimglish on obtient :


"Here is the vocabulary you requested :
to hate: détester, haïr
Excerpt: May Day hating fascist!"


Avec ça, je suis bien avancé !

12 comments

  • Dear Jean-Paul,
    I can't gather anything in such expression.


    What is that "May Day"?


    Mayday (in one single word) is an expression of the navigation phraseology. It comes from French "m'aider" and is to be repeated 3 times in a row at the start of a distress message.


    A person could possibly go by "May Day" as a nickname.


    Facist is an adjective, not a noun.
    If it were "to hate facism", that would make sense.


    It would be fair to tell the context where you picked that expression.


    A lot of good that's done you! (= Te voilà bien avancé!)
  • Again, pardon me for chiming in.


    'A May Day hating facsist' is a person with a utter right-wing political persuasion, who is not all fond of the first day of May, celebrated as holiday in Germany and Austria (and other countries, but not France), commemorating the strike of the North Amercican Laborer Movement on the 1st May of 1886. This day was later established as 'left' holiday.


    It takes no wonder that our little fascist does not love that kind of holidays.
  • Oh I see, a homonymy:
    a homonym is a couple of words that share the same spelling and the same pronounciation, but a different sense: bow, left, skate, stalk...
    May Day (The first day of May, a holiday in honor of working people, as Whacky said plutôt left, whereas the fascist is to be said a person with rather right-wing attitudes)
    and
    May Day(a signal by people being in danger and needing help)
    Thanks for the superintelligent and hilarious reports of Whacky and Joe the crazy to this subject!


    CW Gwendo
  • What small-minded a screwball that Joe!
    As a leftist he didn't even remember what he was used to doing on every May Day: demonstrating!
    As an atheist he didn't even remember that there were sadly three and only three non-working days in his country that weren't of religious origin. The May Day is the most striving one for a leftist the kind of Joe!


    What narrow-minded a screwball that Joe!
    Is his active vocabulary restricted to his navigation phraseology? When he watched two days ago on his telly screen (as did scores of people thoughout the world) a fighter hit by a missile overhead Benghazi, did he just think "Oh! That pilot couldn't send a mayday, neither on his operational frequentie, nor on 121.5 MHz?"


    What a lucky buddy that Joe! He got a relevant and acute reminder from Whacky the brainy. So much the better!


    Moreover it doesn't come as a mild surprise that the crazy Joe was delighted by reading again the Gwendo! (It's been so long...)


    CW & CW


    Warning:
    first CW: just as Gwendo's, means 'corrections welcome'
    second CW: for 'corrections (eagerly) wanted'
  • From Whacky:
    (...) 'A May Day hating facsist' is a person with a utter right-wing political persuasion, who is not all fond of the first day of May,... (...)
    It takes no wonder that our little fascist does not love that kind of holidays.

     
    Logically speaking, Whacky, it seems to me that it should be the opposite. According to your definition the expression should say that a facist is hating May Day.
    I wonder whether a "May Day hating facist" does not point out a left-winger.
    Am I wrong?
    Sandy
    CW
  • Okay dokey, Whacky, I just get knowing I was wrong. In the expression, "May Day" is the object of the verb and the facist is the subject.
    You wrote "A May Day hating facist", the article A helped me to catch the meaning.
    Sorry. We should never call your say into question.
    Sandy
  • From Joe the screwball:
    (...) "Oh! That pilot couldn't send a mayday, neither on his operational frequentie, nor on 121.5 MHz?"
    (...)
    CW & CW (...)

     
    CW & CW ? Here you are Joe!
    Logically speaking two negations working accordingly in a sentence make the statement positive.
    So you had better write:
    Oh! That pilot couldn't send a mayday, either on his operational frequentie, or on 121.5 MHz.
    Ha ha ha!
    Sandy
    CW (a single one will do)
  • From Jean-Paul Pierre:
    Quelle serait la traduction de hating fascist ?
    Si on le demande à Gimglish on obtient :


    "Here is the vocabulary you requested :
    to hate: détester, haïr
    Excerpt: May Day hating fascist!"


    Avec ça, je suis bien avancé !

     
    Hey, Jean-Paul! Were you struck dumb with astonishment at reading Whacky's explanation? or maybe me talking rubbish?
  • The whole thing would have been more obvious, had the compound adjective (is that the correct grammar term?) marked as such by a hyphen:


    'A May-Day-hating fascist' would haven been more understable, like other compound adjectives:


    A Christmas-loving child
    An Easter-celebrating catholic
    A lefty-beating fascist


    Mind you, reality is not that well-ordered, hence it could also be the other way round:
    A fascist-beating lefty.

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