English Vocabulary


Seism or Earthquake (or quake) ?

Is there a different meaning for each of these words often heard, unhappily, these days ?
cheers
Vic.

5 comments

  • Not really. Both words mean the same.


    We, you, I and every normal guy say 'earthquakes'.


    'Seism' is more a technical term, used by experts in geology - these guys in brown vests and corduroys measuring the course of the roads and climbing volcanos.
    W.
  • From Victorine:
    Is there a different meaning for each of these words often heard, unhappily, these days ?
    cheers
    Vic.

     


    Seism is not really used as a noun, earthquake is better , but seismic is the adjective related.
  • the seismology studies earthquaques and seismic is a technic to study earthquakes and it's all so a geophysical petroleum technic.
  • In view of the ghastly human cataclysm in Japan the question might the insignificant. Nevertheless, allow me to straighten things out and not let misleading information stand.


    Basically, the meaning of 'seism' is not arcane, and can be revealed by a host of dictionary entries.


    Hence, in order to keep all shipshape in Bristol fashion:


    Several dictionaries indeed insist that 'seism' be a noun, stemming from the Greek 'seismos', 'a vibration, a quake or a tremor of the surface of the earth, resulting from underground movement along a fault plane of from volcanic activity'


    Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/seism#ixzz1Hk6yj33W

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