English Vocabulary


New-minted

Hello every one!
Once again, I come up against a vocabulary difficulty to which I haven't found yet a satisfactory explanation or an accurate translation in French. I'm sure I can count on you for a help...
Here's the context: It's about a man who is speaking with friends and who proposes something with a "delight new-minted each year". I'm stumped with this term: according to my dictionnary, "new-minted" is only related to coins. In that context, do you think that I could replace that term by "brand new" or "spanking new" to replace - with an idea of recurrence?
Thanking you in advance for any help,
Jicé

5 comments

  • From jicéhen:
    Hello every one!
    Once again, I come up against a vocabulary difficulty to which I haven't found yet a satisfactory explanation or an accurate translation in French. I'm sure I can count on you for a help...
    Here's the context: It's about a man who is speaking with friends and who proposes something with a "delight new-minted each year". I'm stumped with this term: according to my dictionnary, "new-minted" is only related to coins. In that context, do you think that I could replace that term by "brand new" or "spanking new" to replace - with an idea of recurrence?
    Thanking you in advance for any help,
    Jicé

     
  • Hi! Jicé, thanks for the new word "mint", I only knew it for the flavour. As mint is used for coins, I'd suggest "refrappé". "Retoqué" has not the same meaning now "retoquer une loi..." but at a time "toquer" and "frapper" were about the same.
  • 'Mint' is often used in the meaning 'new and as yet unused', brand-new. When you go the the second-hand car seller and he touts a car, claiming that 20.000 Euros were a bargain and a ponce-one-a-lifetime opportunity, because the rusty jalopy is 'practically mint', then you'd better be careful. The old car may be everything- but surely not 'mint'.


    'Mint' originally comes from not yet stamped postage, hence it comes from philately.


    'Newly-minted' is an often figuratively used term, stemming from coin manufacturing, denoting a coin that has been coined recently and therefore hasn't been in circulation yet, 'Newly-minted' is synonym with 'fledgling', describing a particular state someone has reached most recently. For example, if you have passed your university exam as lawyer recently, you are now a 'newly-minted' (=fledgling) lawyer.
  • Thanks a lot for all these very interesting explanations, Wacky. You're still efficient and precise!
    It's exactly what I felt about the excerpt I submitted to the forum, but I wasn't able to put it into words. Moreover, - thanks to you, I discovered some interesting expressions.
    Many thanks once again,
    Jicé
  • I failed in my duty,Ticket Controller: I realize that I've omitted to thank you too for your help. I do it now, belatedly but sincerly !
    Jicé

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