English Idioms


to miss

I have understanding 's problem with the verb to miss, among other.
How cn we translate: you miss me and we miss us?

3 comments

  • As you have understanding problems with expressions using 'to miss', Géraldine, I am pleased to tell you my mind. (no 's genitive with a common noun like 'undestanding')


    "you miss me" = I am longing for you (in French: tu me manques).
    In such expressions, 'to miss' means to feel the lack or suffer from the abence of something or somebody.
    "Are you missing me?" (Fr. Est-ce que je te manque?)
    "She misses her boyfriend."
    "I'm missing my GGlesson on Sundays." = I wish I got it.




    "we miss us" ??
    That's quite more enigmatic!
    Let's figure out the the verb is still used here in the same sense as here above. Example: Every midnight we all get frozen and unconscious. We might say that every midnight, we dreadfully miss us!


    If some people cannot manage to meet, they would say they miss each other (not themselves).


    Let's suppose I try to kill myself on Sundays because I miss my GG lesson, but I fail to hit me every time: I miss me! I am used to missing me.
    If that is the fact of a chorus of GG learners, they could say: We miss us every Sunday. Better: We miss ourselves. Bad gunmen? or simulators?
  • I miss having you here to talk to
    we miss us even if you're impossible to miss
    to miss the connection
    to miss the vocation
  • thank you very much for your help!
    Have a nice day!

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