English Grammar


I will be bringing some students - Future continous?

Today I read the following sentence in my lesson:


Tomorrow I will be bringing a group of students to the offices.
I don't know this grammatical structure to express the future. Is it also correct to say: I will bring a group of students to the offices? And what is the difference of both in meaning?

10 comments

  • Basically, the ing-form is also used to express something that is considered a nuisance, an irritation, something that we don't find pleasant, but rather annoying.


    For example "He is permanently talking about his petty problems. He is getting on my nerves".


    I can imagine in this case, the talker is expressing that his brining a group of students to the office is considered something of a nuisance.


    The non-ing-form ("I will bring a group students" ) is conversely a neutral announcement (into the future). Neutral in the sense that it doesn't imply anything whether it's something annyoing or not.
  • Not convinced, not helped?


    By the way, Fugendichter, we both have a nickname with a similiarity. Both our nicknames denote something that seals somthing. In my case, it seals the cylinder head of an engine,and your sealing material is used in interior construction, laying tiles or laminate floors for example. We are both builders and mechanics. ;)
  • Of course, convinced and helped! Thank you! But at the moment I'm too paresseux (because of the winter-blues) to look at these forms in my grammar to proofread your very interesting explanation. Till now I've never heard such things like irritation-ing-forms or head gaskets.
  • Of course, convinced and helped! Thank you! But at the moment I'm too paresseux (because of the winter-blues) to look at these forms in my grammar to proofread your very interesting explanation. Till now I've never heard such things like irritation-ing-forms or head gaskets.
  • Yes. I hadn't known the term "head gasket" (or "cylinder head gasket") myself until some time ago, when my lawn mower broke down and I figured out it was due to a leakdy cylinder head gasket. The mower was an American product and I had to order the spare part in America - and hence I got to know the term. It also
    inspired me for a nickname.
  • Hi guys,


    I don't think, in this case, that you're right, Head Gasket. I don't think there's any annoyance expressed in the example phrase.


    The annoying answer is: there's no real difference, and often speakers will use the simple future or the future continuous without any real difference in meaning!
  • As a matter of fact - I was not claiming the speaker expresses by all means irritation. I might be - and provided he does, the Future Continuous is the appropriate tense.


    The continuous form is (among others intentions) used to epxresss irritation. In this case, there might be the possibility to use the ing-form in order to express irritation.


    Basically, of course, you can use a tense without the extension to express what that tense usually emphasizes. But- the Enligsh tenses have a stricter meaning than in other languages.


    Mind you, English native speakers are quite senstive when it comes to mixing up tenses and forms. Misunderstandings are very likely then.


    [b]Usually, the Future Continuous used for an action which will take place and a specific time in the future.[/b]


    Hence, there is another possibility, of which I didn't think: The speaker wants to announce that at the same time tomorrow, he will be bringing students.


    Comversely, the simple ing-form doesn't express that little detail in emphasize.


    You are right in so far that both (simple and continuous) say basically the same thing, but the difference lies in the details. And often, that is not to be underestimated.


    Even IF the speaker in this case doesn't intent to express something special, he might be misunderstood when using the ing-form instead of the simply form or vice versa.


    My appeal is: Take the tenses and their forms very seriously. Perhaps more seriously than some (even native) English speakers do. It's far better and avoids misunderstandings.


    And in this case, "I will be bringing" and "I will bring" can be interpreted in a different way.
  • Thanks once more for this detailed statement.
  • Maybe I can put my little piece into this...
    I'd think there's also a notion of [b]duration[/b].
    The speaker will bring the students, and stay with them for the visit, not leave them there by themselves. Then, for me, the continuous form is appropriate...

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