English Grammar


without little warning

In my todays lesson : Edward's Fantastical Journey
I found this expression: without little warning
In my opinion an article is necessary here: without a little warning
What do you think about this subject?

7 comments

  • Why would you put an article, Fugendichter? I presume it is because of the adjective little, for it's usually said 'without warning'.


    I suppose there is a shade of meaning between both expressions.
    Don't you think that "without a little warning" is a bit more like "without a single warning"?
    As for me both are correct even though different.
    As "Every little warning would help Edward", I'd say that every little opinion from a good grammarian would help too.
  • From Fugendichter:
    In my todays lesson : Edward's Fantastical Journey
    I found this expression: without little warning
    In my opinion an article is necessary here: without a little warning
    What do you think about this subject?

     


    Hi guys and girls,


    The actual phrase from the episode is 'with little warning' (not 'without'). On the other hand, the phrase 'without warning' also exists, and means the same thing as 'with little warning'.


    The phrase means that something happened in a surprising or unexpected way. For example: my computer rebooted without warning. It took me by surprise. OR: The tornado struck the town with little warning; no one expected it so soon.


    Hope this helps,


    Andrew
  • I little expected to get a so clear and quick clarification, Andrew. By all odds, you are a great help. Thank you.
    If I am not mistaken, 'with little warning' is the same as with no warning at all.
    Little did we think we had a so good grammarian as a fellow-learner.
    I little imagined that 'little' was an adverb here.
  • PRIVATE AND PERSONAL
    Warning : this a highly confidential message to AhQ. I apologize for making it public. There is no other way around to be heard by AhQ. Every time I warned him and told him off, it was like talking to a brick wall. Only a public declaration is likely to reach him.
    ---------------------------------------------------
    AhQ !
    You are a bad boy. I am cross.
    Once again you put your foot in it! How can you bring Andrew down to the level of a trivial grammarian and a simple fellow-learner? He who is a staff of the GymGlish!
    This blunder was the one too many. After all that I did to sweat it out and lead you to the straight - in vain - I lastly made up my mind. I RESIGN right away. No use telling me you won't do it again. I won't believe it.
    From now on you find yourself soulless. Mindless, consciousless,.. what does make a difference.
    As for me, I don't care. I am available for another soulless being who will be interested in appointing a good soul.
    AhQ's soul (formerly understood)
  • Hi mates,


    apart from your personal debate I would like to thank you for your ideas. Does "without little warning" have the same meaning as "without the slightest warning" or "without the least warning"?


    Thanks in advance.
    Have a nice weekend!
  • Hello Fugendichter
    "Without/with no warning" means "out of the blue" or "without any signs". Warning is here uncountable. But "a warning" is more a spoken threat(a word of warning) or a definite, known danger and both cannot really be little. And "without little warning" means then "totally out of the blue" or just "without the slightest signs".


    The thunder came without little warning. (As the sky was totally blue.)
    SDC (Sudden Cardiac Death) comes usually without early warning.
    Similar you can find the expression "give warning" (forewarn) or "give a warning" (maybe a yellow card).


    Toodle-oo
  • Yes, I got it. Thanks capablanca: white cap?

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